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Jermell Charlo scores knockout win over Jeison Rosario

Written By | Sep 27, 2020
Jermell Charlo made it two wins for the Charlo Brothers on Saturday, capping the night with a knockout win. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

Jermell Charlo made it two wins for the Charlo Brothers on Saturday, capping the night with a knockout win. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

SAN DIEGO, Calif., September 26, 2020 – Jermell Charlo delivered a pinpoint accurate missile of a jab to the body, paralyzing Jeison Rosario to end their unification fight with an impressive knockout victory just 21 seconds into the eighth round. Charlo of Houston, Texas (34-1,18 KOs) is now the unified WBC, WBA, and IBF super welterweight champion.

“I definitely proved that I’m more than just a puncher, but I proved I’m a puncher,” said Charlo. “I listened to my coach, everything he told me to do in training camp I did. I’m definitely bringing home the straps like they told me to. If you didn’t get your training down at home, you can’t get it down in the bubble, It separates the boys from the men.”

Jermell Charlo said he proved he’s more than a power puncher. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

It might be the most impressive win of Charlo’s career, coming at the end of a long evening of fights including an equally impressive by his brother Jermall Charlo in his middleweight title defense. But Jermell Charlo took a different route to his win.

Charlo scored an early knockdown at the end of the first round from an awkward off-balance exchange where he landed a hard left hook to the top of Rosario’s head. Rosario recovered quickly, and took the fight to Charlo in the next few rounds by working the body. Charlo complained about low blows, and referee Harvey Dock kept warning Rosario about straying punches.




Jeison Rosario did his best to fight out of the hole dug by two knockouts. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing Jermell Charlo scores knockout

Jeison Rosario did his best to fight out of the hole dug by two knockouts. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

Charlo continued to work at a distance as Rosario pressed the action. He had ground to makeup and he kept working. Rosario’s trainer Luis Perez urged him to stay busy, and he started digging out of his hole on the scorecard. Charlo responded with quality shots. His big punches were impressive, but in these round there weren’t enough of them. Trainer Derrick James told Charlo to be busier.

In the sixth round during an exchange along the ropes, Charlo put Rosario back in a scorecard hole with a hard left hook, right to the temple. It was short and compact. Rosario wobbled and wisely took a knee before he went down. Rosario survived only because it was at the very end of the round. Rosario took it easy in round seven and seemed all right.

Then Charlo unleashed the jab from hell, and the fight was over before referee Harvey Dock could even consider a count.

Jermell Charlo is now the unified super welterweight champion with three of the four major titles. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

The fight was close at the time of the stoppage with Charlo winning 67-64 X 2 and 66-65.

Charlo said despite the two knockdowns he knew Rosario would keep coming, but the knockout would come. “I have explosive power in each of my hands … When you wear a fighter down, you take it out of him. That’s what I did.”

Charlo believed the knockout punch was so effective because of the body work leading up to it. “That body shot I landed must have hit at an accurate point. I wish him well, I give respect to any man who steps in the ring. I hope he recovers but leave me alone. I’m the man at 154,” smile Charlo.

Rosario was taken to an area hospital after the bout for observation due to the nature of the knockout. He is now 20-2-1 with 14 KOs.

READ MORE: Jermall Charlo defeats Sergiy Derevyanchenko, delivering geography master class

Charlo’s win capped a great night for the Charlo twins. With his older brother (by one minute) looking on, Jermell Charlo said, “It’s Lions Only, that’s how we do it. We’ve been doing it for a long time. Dreams do come true. I’m satisfied, I’m happy. My brother won tonight … He’s my biggest fan, I love him to death.” Charlo credited his trainer Derrick James and also his stablemate Errol Spence, Jr. for his performance.

Luis Nery wins WBC Super Bantamweight title but fails to impress

Luis Nery wins the WBC Super Bantamweight title in his first fight in the division. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

Luis Nery wins the WBC Super Bantamweight title in his first fight in the division. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

Former world champion Luis Nery of Mexico (31-0, 24 KOs) won his debut at super bantamweight against undefeated Aaron Alameda of Long Beach, California (25-1, 13 KOs), but not in the fashion most fans expected. Nery went 12 rounds for the first time as a pro, winning the decision with scores of 118-110, 116-112, and 115-113. Nery wins the vacant WBC title given up by Rey Vargas due to injury. Alameda walked out of the ring shaking his head.

In his first fight training with Eddy Reynoso, Nery was active from the opening bell, but Alameda stayed right with him. In the earlier rounds, Alameda kept Nery from imposing his will, and Nery seemed content to go along for the ride. Alameda’s best weapon turned out to be a solid uppercut.



Aaron Alameda delivered a better performance than fans expected. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

Aaron Alameda delivered a better performance than fans expected. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

Midway through the fight, Reynoso told Nery, “We need to pressure more in this fight. It’s an easy fight.” Alameda’s trainer urged him to go to the body. Nery stepped up his work rate, and so did Alameda.

“The great fighters have balls to win the tough rounds. These are the championship rounnds. You’re tired? I’m tired too” said Reynoso after the tenth round. Nery picked up the pace, but he couldn’t put away Alameda.

Nery won but didn’t impress. It’s only one fight, and the Reynosos like their fighters to be patient. Let’s see if Nery is getting used to a new approach and better integrates his power in his next fights, or whether La Pantera has been neutered.

Luis Nery faced a determined opponent in Aaron Alameda. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

Luis Nery faced a determined opponent in Aaron Alameda. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

Danny Roman pushes back against Juan Carlos Payano to win

Danny Roman had a bigger battle on his hands than he expected against Juan Carlos Payano. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

Danny Roman had a bigger battle on his hands than he expected against Juan Carlos Payano. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

Danny Román of Los Angeles (27-3-1, 10 KOs) took a unanimous decision against former champion Juan Carlos Payano of Miami (21-3, 9 KOs) in a WBC Super Bantamweight title eliminator. All three scorecards had it 116-112.

The bout appeared much closer. Someone forgot to tell the veteran Payano he was the underdog in this fight. Moving up to the bantamweight division after suffering knockout losses to Luis Nery and Naoya Inoue at 118 pounds turned out to be genius. Payano found new life and new energy at 122 pounds. He kept up and exceeded the activity rate of busy fighter Roman, and he got the better of it in many rounds.

“I don’t take nothing away from Payano, he’s a great fighter,” said Roman. He made some adjustments during the fight, he starting moving around a little more, so I had to adjust to that.”

Payano hurt Roman with a body punch in the eighth round, and it fueled his fire even more. Roman wasn’t able to adjust. It was a fight changing round for Payano. He began to believe in his game plan, and it was Roman looking for a way to win rounds. The scorecards were even after eight rounds.

Someone forgot to tell Juan Carlos Payano he was the underdog in this fight. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

Someone forgot to tell Juan Carlos Payano he was the underdog in this fight. Photo: Amanda Westcott, Showtime Boxing

Just as he did in his narrow loss to Murodjon Akhmadaliev in January, Roman rallied and came to life, ripping body shots to push Payano back. Trainer Eddie Gonzalez told Roman, “You have to push the pace.”

“Like the devil he’s coming out, so be careful,” said Payano’s trainer Herman Caicedo before the 12th round. At the end of the round, Roman landed a hard left hook just before the final bell. Payano was dropped, but the referee didn’t acknowledge it. Fortunately for Roman, it wasn’t the difference in the fight. Its lasting value is restoring confidence to Roman as he moves forward after two tough bouts, whether or not it counted in the fight.

“I know I connected with a left hook. Although the bell rang once I hit him, I knew I connected with him,” said Roman.

Payano landed more punches than Roman – 261 of 804 (32 percent) against 152 of 633 punches (24 percent).

At age 36, after wicked knockout losses to Luis Nery and Naoya Inoue in two of his last three rights, give Payano credit for remaining competitive. Payano still has something to offer at an age where many of the fighters in the smaller weight divisions have called it a career. Having six children include a one-year-old might be his motivation. He looked ten years younger than his age.

Gayle Lynn Falkenthal is a veteran boxing observer covering the Sweet Science for Communities. Read more Ringside Seat in Communities Digital News. Follow Gayle on Twitter and Instagram at @PRProSanDiego.

Copyright © 2020 by Falcon Valley Group

Gayle Falkenthal

Gayle Lynn Falkenthal, MS, APR, is President of the Falcon Valley Group, a San Diego based communications consulting firm. Falkenthal is a veteran award-winning broadcast and print journalist, editor, producer, talk host and commentator. She is an instructor at National University in San Diego, and previously taught in the School of Journalism & Media Studies at San Diego State University.