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Jeff Bezos, The Washington Post leads the virtue signaling Super Bowl ads

Written By | Feb 4, 2019
Virtue Signaling, Super Bowl LIII, Super Bowl Ad, Washington Post, Jeff Bezos, Stephen Nemo

WASHINGTON. There was nothing surprising about the New England Patriots dispatching the Los Angeles Rams in Super Bowl LII’s messy, low-scoring slugfest. What was unusual was the annoyingly preachy lectures inserted into the event’s much-anticipated, multimillion-dollar Super Bowl ads.

Hot air, Budweiser and Clydesdales
Virtue Signaling, Super Bowl LIII, Super Bowl Ad, Washington Post, Jeff Bezos, Stephen Nemo

Budweiser Super Bowl Ad

Anheuser Busch’s wagon-pulling Clydesdales and Dalmatian sentry, introduced to the nation in celebration of Prohibition’s repeal in 1933, skipped expounding the tasty virtues of their mood-altering, amber tonic this year.




Instead, they virtue-signaled about those massive eyesores despoiling the American landscape – wind generators. And to the sound of Bob Dylan’s “Blowing in the Wind” no less.

Virtue Signaling Goliath vs. Pippi Longstocking

Virtue Signaling, Super Bowl LIII, Super Bowl Ad, Washington Post, Jeff Bezos, Stephen Nemo

An even more ridiculous ad was provided by the network telecasting the mega sports event, CBS. It celebrated “girl power” by showing adolescent females matched against the gridiron behemoths of the New York Giants.

In a voice that for a moment sounds like a sonorous harangue by Hillary Clinton, “CBS This Morning” co-anchor Gayle King contends:

“When girls face their challenges, they’re stronger. When girls work together, they realize their value. When girls get to play, they learn to win.”

Incredibly, the ad did not display a lawyerly disclaimer at the bottom of the screen urging America’s diminutive damsels “not to try this at home.” Should they attempt to emulate CBS’s silly, PC fantasy, it could cost the network all its Super Bowl advertising revenue in one spectacular class-action lawsuit.

The Washington Post: Not worth the paper it’s printed on

Virtue Signaling, Super Bowl LIII, Super Bowl Ad, Washington Post, Jeff Bezos, Stephen Nemo

But the worst was the ad by the Washington Post. An ad that cost the paper’s billionaire owner Jeff Bezos a cool $5.2 million. An ad that insisted “knowing empowers us. Knowing helps us decide. Knowing keeps us free.”

The presidential election of 2016 disproved the notion that traditional media in any way “helps us decide.”

On November 8, 2016, election day, the Post predicted Clinton would “have a five-point advantage in the major-party vote” and saying  “the forecast is for Clinton to win 323 electoral votes to Trump’s 215.”

In the early morning hours of November 9, Trump won 306 electoral votes to Clinton’s 232. If anything, Donald Trump’s victory was an illuminating searchlight focused on the dissembling biases of those who keep telling us “democracy dies in darkness.”



The Post’s commercial, showing images of the D-Day landing, the US flag planted on the lunar surface, and California firefighters battling the recent wildfires, confuses its witness to history with those brave souls who actually make that history.

Last June, Washington Post employees released an open letter to their boss Jeff Bezos.

In it, they asked for “fair wages; fair benefits for retirement, family leave and health care; and a fair amount of job security.”

And they did a fair amount of virtue-signaling of their own:

“The Post is not just any business venture. But even if it were – this would not be the way to show that you value your employees… you not only can lead the way in creating wealth but that you also know how to share it with the people who helped you create it.”

Virtue Signaling, Super Bowl LIII, Super Bowl Ad, Washington Post, Jeff Bezos, Stephen Nemo

Jeff Bezos. Top Trending screen capture.

It seems his answer came in the form of a $5.2 million, one-minute Super Bowl ad. One whose virtue-signaling the Post’s newsroom thralls will have to glean a modicum of psychic nourishment. (REPORT: Jeff Bezos BLASTED by WashPo staff, other reporters, for spending $5 million on Super Bowl ad)

After all, what are mere dollars in comparison to that warm feeling that comes with public displays of self-congratulatory moralizing?

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Top Image: Super Bowl LII. CBS Sports screen capture.

Steven M. Lopez

Originally from Los Angeles, Steven M. Lopez has been in the news business for more than thirty years. He made his way around the country: Arizona, the Bay Area and now resides in South Florida.