Golovkin vs. Geale preview, HBO Saturday, 9:30 p.m. ET (Video)

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Gennady Golovkin trains for his fight Saturday against Daniel Geale in New York. Photo: Will Hart, HBO
Gennady Golovkin trains for his fight Saturday against Daniel Geale in New York. Photo: Will Hart, HBO

SAN DIEGO, July 25, 2014 – While boxing fans wait patiently to see middleweight champion Gennady “Triple G” Golovkin take on a world class opponent, they are happy to see him back in the ring this Saturday at Madison Square Garden. Golovkin will face Australian middleweight Daniel Geale in a 12-round bout for the 11th defense of his WBA and IBO titles Saturday.

HBO televises the fight card from MSG beginning at 9:30 p.m. ET. Communities Digital News will host a live online chat for the televised bouts.

Gennady Golovkin and Daniel Geale pose after their weigh-in Friday in New York. Both made the 160-pound middleweight limit. Photo: Will Hart, HBO
Gennady Golovkin and Daniel Geale pose after their weigh-in Friday in New York. Both made the 160-pound middleweight limit. Photo: Will Hart, HBO

Golovkin (29-0, 26 KOs) added his 16th straight and 26th knockout victory in February against Osumanu Adama, who lost to Geale (30-2, 16 KOs) in Australia in 2012. Golovkin then cancelled his scheduled bout with Andy Lee in April due to the death of his father. His team tried to make a bout this month between Golovkin and super middleweight Julio Caesar Chavez Jr., a fight that got plenty of fans excited. But the Chavez camp couldn’t close the deal at its end.

As a top five middleweight, Geale was the next best choice. Due credit goes to Geale and his promotional team for being willing to take on Golovkin. The reward is the opportunity to perform on a very big stage at Madison Square Garden, the dream of any boxer in the world.


Be careful what you wish for.

Geale is warrior tough, in the proud tradition of Australian fighters of all stripes. He is a legitimate opponent and deserves respect for his ability and attitude. Geale will give it all he’s got and should provide a bit more of a challenge to Golovkin than his previous opponents. But this scale is relative.

With every fight, “Triple G” nudges observers closer to declaring him among the best pound for pound boxers in the world. He punches with efficient power, grounded in a first-rate work ethic, superb conditioning, speed and solid footwork. There is nowhere to hide in a fight with Golovkin. He cuts off the ring as well as any boxer alive, an underappreciated skill. He keeps his opponents right in front of him, puts body shots in the bank until he can land a knockout punch and calls it a night.

Watching him in the ring recently at the BoxNBurn Gym in Santa Monica, California during a media exhibition, observers all commented on his quickness and the amount of ground he can cover in the ring. Watch Golovkin in action in this video clip.

Golovkin’s punching power has been compared to Mike Tyson. Yes, he is that good. Outside the ring Golovkin looks like your neighbor down the street who would lend you his lawn mower. At Friday’s weigh-in, Golovkin smiled and shook hands with Geale. He bears his opponents no ill will. He has a job he loves to do and he does it well.

People are fascinated by this contrast between Golovkin’s gracious manners and congeniality outside the ring, and the steely focus of an assassin inside the ring. He has only one mission: search and destroy, and he does it extremely well. Trainer Abel Sanchez said recently Golovkin is “the easiest fighter I’ve ever worked with, and the best I’ve ever worked with… He never questions anything, he does what he’s told,” said Sanchez.

It's rare to see Gennady Golovkin without a smile on his face outside the ring. Photo: Will Hart, HBO.
It’s rare to see Gennady Golovkin without a smile on his face outside the ring. Photo: Will Hart, HBO.

It’s becoming tedious to write “Golovkin can’t overlook (insert opponent name here).” This bout sets up the rest of 2014, which should produce some bigger name competition. Possibilities: Miguel Cotto or Julio Caesar Chavez Jr. Cotto vs. Golovkin at the Garden in December could happen though Cotto seems headed toward a fight with Canelo Alvarez. Andre Ward is in the wings if he can get his contract dispute solved.

It’s just as much of a test of Golovkin’s drawing power with fans. This will be his first fight in the main Madison Square Garden arena instead of the smaller theater. If ticket sales are good and HBO’s viewer numbers are strong, promoters will have the money to pay a significant opponent the money it’s going to take to risk getting into the ring against the fearsome Golovkin. Otherwise, the risk vs. reward ratio is way too high.

It might take him a few more rounds than usual, but Golovkin should add the win over Geale. The only suspense in this fight is whether Golovkin will put another entry into the “Knockout of the Year” sweepstakes by the end of the bout. Geale should test Triple G just enough to make it an entertaining fight to watch.

Mike Perez and Bryant Jennings at their weigh-in Friday in New York. Photo: Will Hart, HBO
Mike Perez and Bryant Jennings at their weigh-in Friday in New York. Photo: Will Hart, HBO

In the undercard feature, two undefeated heavyweights will meet in an elimination fight, Mike Perez (20-0-1, 12 KOs) who is a former Cuban boxer now living and training in Ireland; and American Bryant Jennings (18-0, 10 KOs) of Philadelphia. The winner will face the winner of the fight between Bermane Stiverne and Deontay Wilder.

Perez is regrettably best known for a fight last November against Russian Magomed Abdusalamov, in which “Mago” suffered significant brain damage and has been left seriously disabled. Perez didn’t perform well in his next bout, barely getting a majority draw. This fight will determine whether Perez’s will has been shaken too much to be effective anymore.

Jennings is a versatile athlete who played football and basketball and was a track and field star in high school. He is a lean heavyweight with an exceptionally long reach, and he has exceptional speed for a larger man. He didn’t start boxing until he was 24 and had his first pro fight in 2010. Jennings is still learning, but he has all the tools to become an exciting heavyweight.

Perez outweighed Jennings by nearly 20 pounds at the weigh-in, 242.2 to 222.6.

Gayle Lynn Falkenthal, APR, is President/Owner of the Falcon Valley Group in San Diego, California. She is also a serious boxing fan covering the Sweet Science for Communities. Read more Ringside Seat in Communities Digital News. Follow Gayle on Facebook and on Twitter @PRProSanDiego. Gayle can be reached via Google +

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