Skip to main content

Deontay Wilder unleashes the beast, scores knockout win over Luis Ortiz Jr.

Written By | Nov 24, 2019
Deontay Wilder (left) walks away after his one punch knockout of Luis Ortiz Saturday. Photo: Ryan Hafey, Premier Boxing Champions WilderFury 2 Fight Week

Deontay Wilder (left) walks away after his one punch knockout of Luis Ortiz in November. Photo: Ryan Hafey, Premier Boxing Champions

LAS VEGAS, Nevada, November 24, 2019 – WBC Heavyweight World Champion Deontay “The Bronze Bomber” Wilder was losing on all three scorecards to challenger Luis “King Kong” Ortiz through seven rounds by scores of 58-56 and 59-55 twice. But it didn’t matter.

Wilder (42-0-1, 41 KOs) unleashed a single right hand to the temple of Ortiz at 2:51 of the seventh round, and the scorecards went into the shredder, just as they have 40 previous times. Wilder successfully defended his title with another one-punch knockout victory Saturday night at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. It was his tenth consecutive title defense.

“It was an amazing fight. I saw the opportunity, I took it,” said Wilder after the fight. “These guys have to be perfect for me for 12 rounds. I only have to be perfect for two seconds.”

Ortiz winning round by round – until he wasn’t

Luis Ortiz was controlling the action and winning on all three scorecards when the fight ended. Photo: Ryan Hafey, Premier Boxing Champions

Luis Ortiz was controlling the action and winning on all three scorecards when the fight ended. Photo: Ryan Hafey, Premier Boxing Champions

Ortiz controlled the action during the first six rounds. He appeared in superb condition, working well behind a strong jab, moving and scoring with overhand left shots. He was working through the fight one round at a time, doing what he needed to do to win and move on to the next round. It’s a great strategy – against anyone except Wilder.




“To be honest, I never worry if I’m losing the fight or not,” explained Wilder. “I’m blessed with something these guys aren’t blessed with. It’s tremendous power. When you have power like I have, I don’t worry whether I’m losing rounds or not. I don’t want my mind to be cloudy. Sooner or later it’s going to come and bam baby, good night.”

Wilder said he had to be smart fighting Ortiz. “With Ortiz, you can see why no other heavyweight wants to fight him,” said Wilder. “He’s very crafty, he moves strategically and his intellect is very high. I had to measure him in certain places.” Wilder has a good jab, although he’s not always busy enough with it.

Wilder said he had to wait patiently for the right opening, trying to get himself into a position to throw the right hand. It happened in the seventh round.

Wilder: ‘I’ve earned my due respect”

Deontay Wilder said he deserves to be recognized as the hardest puncher in boxing history. Photo: Ryan Hafey, Premier Boxing Champions

Deontay Wilder said he deserves to be recognized as the hardest puncher in boxing history. Photo: Ryan Hafey, Premier Boxing Champions

“At this point in time, you gotta give me my credit. It’s sad it took over 40 fights to truly get the recognition I deserve,” said Wilder. “I know it took them a while to get used to the talent I display. It’s different than any other fighter. What I do is not textbook, you can’t really teach it.  I think I’ve earned my due respect and my credit to say that I am the hardest-hitting puncher in boxing history, period.” Few would argue about it at this point.

“This is boxing,” said Ortiz. “I said that one of us was going to get knocked out and it wasn’t going to go 12 rounds. I was clear-headed when I hit the canvas. When I heard the referee say seven I was trying to get up, but I guess the count went a little quicker than I thought.

“This was a great fight and I thought I was clearly winning,” continued Ortiz. “I got caught with a big shot and I have to give Deontay Wilder a lot of credit.  I knew my movement was giving him problems.  I landed some big shots and I thought I had him hurt.  I thought I was up by the count and could have continued.”

Ortiz says he will continue to fight and seek a heavyweight title.  “If there is any heavyweight that thinks I’m old, jump the ropes and get in the ring,” said Ortiz. “Deontay showed great will and I’m not ashamed with my performance,” said Ortiz. “I know I can beat anyone in the heavyweight division. My career is not over. I’m going to work my way back into a title fight.”

Wilder said his focus is on unifying titles in the heavyweight division. “Now we move on to the next phase. I’m looking to be undisputed heavyweight champion of the world. I’m getting closer to that each and every time,” said Wilder. One punch at a time.

Wilder and Tyson Fury of Great Britain are reportedly heading for an agreed-upon rematch in February 2020, but there is nothing signed and sealed. Fury may need more time than anticipated after suffering a serious cut in his fight with Otto Wallin on September 14.  While fans are waiting, all eyes will turn to the Middle East on December 7 for the outcome of the rematch between Anthony Joshua and Andy Ruiz Jr.

Read More: Viva Nicaragua – Rene Alvarado takes title home with TKO win over Andrew Cancio

Gayle Lynn Falkenthal, APR, is President/Owner of the Falcon Valley Group in San Diego, California. She is a veteran boxing observer covering the Sweet Science for Communities. Read more Ringside Seat in Communities Digital News. Follow Gayle on Facebook and on Twitter @PRProSanDiego.



Please credit “Gayle Falkenthal for Communities Digital News” when quoting from or linking to this story.  

Copyright © 2019 by Falcon Valley Group

 

 

Gayle Falkenthal

Gayle Lynn Falkenthal, MS, APR, is President of the Falcon Valley Group, a San Diego based communications consulting firm. Falkenthal is a veteran award-winning broadcast and print journalist, editor, producer, talk host and commentator. She is an instructor at National University in San Diego, and previously taught in the School of Journalism & Media Studies at San Diego State University.