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Oops! Cancel culture boots former Republican Senator Rick Santorum from CNN

Written By | May 26, 2021
Santorum, CNN, Cancel Culture

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SAN DIEGO Rick Santorum, former Republican senator turned television news commentator, has been fired from CNN. You won’t hear anyone at CNN admit that this may have been little more than an excuse to rid themselves of one of their few conservative analysts. Instead, they point to a disturbing statement from April 23 that eventually got their attention. Santorum’s fatal words were spoken to a group of young conservatives on April 23.

“We birthed a nation from nothing…Yes, there were Native Americans, but there isn’t much Native American culture in American culture.”

Santorum has apologized; Santorum has explained what he meant. It doesn’t matter. The stallion has left the coral and few corals remain in today’s world of WOKE.

On CNN’s “Cuomo Prime Time” Santorum evaluated his words by claiming he “misspoke.”

He then went on to explain that he was talking about the FOUNDING of the United States as a GOVERNMENT rather than the American culture itself. Santorum emphasized that Native Americans “had a huge impact, particularly in the west and many of the areas of our country where they have had a huge impact on American culture.”




On Fox News’ “Hannity,” Santorum stood by his message, at least the point he originally intended.

“What I said was not at all disparaging towards Native Americans… What I was talking about is the founding of the United States of America and that Native Americans did not have a role in the founding of our country…Now you can say that’s a bad thing or a good thing or the way we treated Native Americans was bad, but I was giving a talk to a group of young people talking about the founding principles of religious liberty and how important it was to the immigrants who came here to found this country. And that was an important value that was envied into our Constitution.”

At the end of the day, Santorum believes he was booted for “telling the truth.”

This incident, while sad, should come as no surprise. In the name of “cancel culture,” we have gotten used to “much ado about nothing.”  And I am using that phrase, the title of a Shakespeare play, deliberately. Let’s use what we can before Shakespeare’s entire works are also  canceled.

No thinking person would deny that the United States owes the greatest of apologies to Native Americans.

Many of them were butchered and all of them in the passage of time had their land taken away. Reservations, while at least a gesture of penitence, serve as a poor substitute for the open, glorious freedom so many tribes once had.

When talking about America as land and continent, Native Americans were here first, and obviously, they have been a vital part of what has shaped our culture.

On the other hand, if Santorum was talking basically about governments and the forging of our Constitution, he is referencing something quite different.

Actually a good deal of scholarly debate has been going on for quite some time claiming that our Constitution may indeed have been inspired to some degree by Native American life, particularly the Iroquois Confederacy.

During our Constitution’s 1987 bicentennial, the U.S. Senate passed a resolution:

“The confederation of the original 13 colonies into one republic was influenced by the political system developed by the Iroquois Confederacy, as were many of the democratic principles which were incorporated into the constitution itself.”

Debates notwithstanding does anyone at CNN really believe Santorum is some kind of racist who was attempting to demean Native Americans?

Probably not; probably this is an act of mere cowardice and capitulation.



Many Native Americans themselves see America as something outside of our republic’s government and history. They associate a large portion of their identity with nations other than the United States. While Native American reservations are actually better compared with sovereign states than sovereign nations, they do describe themselves (among other ways) as “nations.”

According to the National Congress of American Indians:

“Currently, 573 sovereign tribal nations (variously called tribes, nations, bands, pueblos, communities, and Native villages) have a formal nation to nation relationship with the US government. These tribal governments are legally defined as “federally recognized tribes.” Two-hundred-and-twenty-nine of these tribal nations are located in Alaska; the remaining tribes are located in 35 other states. In total, tribal governments exercise jurisdiction over lands that would make Indian Country the fourth largest state in the nation.”

Yes, Native Americans have been influential upon America. It is also true that Santorum’s comment intended no slighting or disrespect to this truth. But then, it’s been a long time since CNN and other outlets of the mainstream media have lost sleep over-reporting the truth.

This is Bob Siegel, making the obvious, obvious.

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Read more from Bob Siegel

A graduate of Denver Seminary and San Jose State University, Bob Siegel is a radio talk show host and popular guest speaker at churches and college campuses across the country, using a variety of media including, seminars, formal debates, outdoor open forums, and one man drama presentations. In addition to his own weekly radio show (KCBQ 1170, San Diego)  In addition to CDN, Bob is a regular contributor for San Diego Rostra. Bob does a good deal of playwriting as well (14 plays & 5 collaborations), including the award-winning, Eternal Reach. Bob has also published books of both fiction and non-fiction including; I’d Like to Believe In Jesus, But…and a fantasy novel, The Dangerous Christmas Ornament.

Fox News and PolitiFact contributed to the hard news portions of this article.

 

 

 

 

Bob Siegel

A graduate of Denver Seminary and San Jose State University, Bob Siegel is a radio talk show host and popular guest speaker at churches and college campuses across the country, using a variety of media including, seminars, formal debates, outdoor open forums, and one man drama presentations. In addition to his own weekly radio show (KCBQ 1170, San Diego) Bob has been a guest on many other programs, including The 700 Club, Washington Times Radio's Inside the Story, The Rick Amato Show, KUSI Television's Good Morning San Diego, and the world popular Jonathan Parkradio drama series, for which Bob guest starred in two episodes and wrote one episode, The Clue From Ninevah. In addition to CDN, Bob is a regular contributor for San Diego Rostra. Bob does a good deal of playwriting as well (14 plays & 5 collaborations), including the award winning, Eternal Reach. Bob has also published books of both fiction and non-fiction including; I'd Like to Believe In Jesus, But...and a fantasy novel, The Dangerous Christmas Ornament.