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Kuulume Stephens: Black conservative advocate, mother, actress, model

Written By | Oct 2, 2021
Kuulume Stephens, Justice Lee, Republican, Black

Kuulumee Stephens

Kuuleme Stephens is also known as Justice Lee . Stephens is an Actress, Singer, and Model living in Tucson, Arizona. Kuuleme Stephens is also a Mother, Professional Wrestler, Navy Veteran, Writer, Book Co-Author, Public Speaker, Radio Host/Co-Host and Veteran, Political, and Victims Advocate. Since leaving her work in the Adult Entertainment Industry, Kuuleme has concentrated on Community Advocacy by joining numerous nonprofit boards and organizations, including becoming an Elected Official in her hometown.

Kuulume Stephens, aka Justice Lee loves community involvement as she continues her pursuits in the mainstream Entertainment Industry.

In an exclusive interview, actress, singer, parent, and political activist Kuulume Stephens shares with COMMDIGINEWS her professional routine, political involvement, and family activities amidst a very busy schedule.

CDN:

Ms. Stephens, we appreciate your taking the time to do this interview.




Kuulume:

It’s my pleasure.

CDN:

What is the most influential thing or person that has influenced your life?

Kuulume:

I was raised by my Great Grandparents. To me, that’s the important catalyst. Because of a variety of circumstances, my parents and grandparents were unable to care for me in my formative years. My Great grandparents instilled great values in my life. Their rearing, values and loving nurturing are the reasons why I see the world differently than today’s younger generation, and even most in my own generation.

 

Kuulume Stephens, Justice Lee, Republican, Black, Grandparents

Kuulume with her great-grandparents

CDN:

What led you to become a political activist?

Kuulume:

My big mouth! I was frustrated about what has been going on in America, and I decided to write a note on Facebook in order to vent. Well, it took off from there. I and another Black Conservative woman (Babette Holder) became co-founders of a Facebook group called: “The Last Civil Right.” Others have since come alongside us. Our motto is: “Conservative women who say the things most people are afraid to say!”

CDN:

Candace Owens appears to be a courageous Black woman on the forefront of fighting for Conservative values. Any thoughts about her and Black Conservatives in general?

Kuulume:

As far as Candace Owens I believe that while she does serve a purpose by being able to reach the younger generation which the Republican Party does need… people are forgetting the ones that came before her. Candace is more media-oriented, whereas we are more boots/heels on the ground – out working within our communities to make a difference. Before Candace, there were people like Kira Davis, Stacey Dash, Alveda King, Mia Love, Starr Parker, Diamond and Silk, and many others.

I believe the people in the Republican Party and non-minorities need to be mindful of how they push (or promote) some of our minority Conservatives. Sometimes, no matter how well their intentions are, they can do more harm than good. They prop them up so high and make them out to be “perfect people,” so as soon as one little thing comes out bad about them it’s easy for the Left to tear them down. The consequences are harder for minority conservatives to overcome when this happens.  If the same happened to a Liberal, it is mostly overlooked, unreported, or excused.

CDN:

What role does the mainstream media (MSM) have in public perceptions about Conservatives?



Kuulume:

The MSM seems to have a short attention span when it comes to keeping people around. You never want to put down, minimize the ones that came before them who paved their way, and have been doing the same work long before the new “flavor of the month” personality came along! We do need more minorities speaking up and sharing their views. As far as Liberals are concerned, Black Conservatives and Republicans do not exist. Many minorities are afraid to speak out publicly or change their political party for fear of being ridiculed, called names, losing friends and family, becoming an outcast or disowned.

The Democrats have also done a great job in their indoctrination within the Black and Hispanic communities, so now we see people choosing the “D” because it’s traditional and passed down from generation to generation. One issue that comes to mind, is the fact that Conservatives applaud minority conservatives when they bring up the fact that we don’t view people like Jesse Jackson or Al Sharpton as the leaders of the Black Community. There wasn’t a conference call, mail-in ballot, or in-person vote to elect these people as leaders. They assume that Blacks are a monolithic people, and are told that these were the so-called “leaders and voices” for our community as a whole, with no input from us at all.

CDN:

You regularly post on social media that you vote Republican, and you support Trump. What reactions do you get from that position?

Kuulume:

Let’s see… they have said: “You’re not black; Aunt Jemima, and other vitriolic comments that I can’t mention in this interview. And even though I’m female, some of those jokers call me Uncle Tom.”

CDN:

Do Democrat/Liberal Blacks attack you?

Kuulume:

Yes, they do. Blacks (and some Hispanics) are harder on me. White Liberals try to cloud the issue in a discussion by straw man arguments, or by trying to persuade me with opinions. My position is those true conservatives argue with the facts, and always have the upper hand because they have the truth. When Liberals start losing the argument, they resort to name-calling and threats, or the Race Card.

CDN:

Is there anything about you that would surprise Liberals and Black Democrats?

Kuulume:

I am not afraid to reach across the aisle and work with Democrats when it’s for the benefit of the American people. The only way to do this is if we are communicating with each other, not shutting each other out and ignoring the issues over a “D” and “R”. For example I sit on the Juneteenth Board here in Tucson, Arizona and do work with our Democrat Mayor at times. I do this because I believe  Black History needs to be taught correctly, preserved, and not forgotten. In order to move forward and make headway in the Black Community people must know where we come from AND see how far we have come. As a Board Member I get to be instrumental in helping with this and also get to hear the issues the Left has with the Republican Party. By knowing what the issues are, we can then address them and work on ways to fix them.

CDN:

Why don’t you just become an Independent so you can work with both Democrats and GOP?

Kuulume:

The only reason I am a Republican is that in order to make a difference in the world of politics, you have to choose aside. As an Independent, you don’t really have a voice when it comes to having any political weight in our country. I chose the Republican Party because the platform (not necessarily individuals) appealed and aligned more with my conservative views and beliefs. I was taught by my Great Grandmother that it was my character and my brain that mattered most and that my skin color did not hinder me from attaining anything in life as long as I educated myself, worked hard and didn’t blame everyone else for my own personal failures.

CDN:

Do you have any examples of threats?

Kuulume:

Once, someone threw a mannequin’s head in my backyard that had been made to appear decapitated and bloody. In another instance, Black Lives Matter activists circulated information to place a bounty on my life.

CDN:

Have any of your family members turned on you, or disowned you because of your conservative views?

Kuulume:

Actually, no they have not. And while some don’t see eye-to-eye with me on some issues, none that I know of have turned their backs on me. Our family has remained loving and supportive of one another!

CDN:

Why do you continue to support Trump and Republicans?

Kuulume:

I don’t support either of them, per se. Rather, I support key Conservative principles and ideals that follow the U.S. Constitution. Having said that, I say yes that I support Donald J. Trump. He is a man of principle, and he supports things that are good for America and its citizens.

CDN:

Any thoughts about BLM and Liberal efforts to DEFUND the police?

Kuulume:

The preamble to the Constitution only gives one, and ONLY ONE thing that the government is to provide for its citizens: “Provide for the common defense.” That includes our military, police, and First Responders. Interestingly, when those same people have a threat to their livelihood or property, they are the first to call the police. Rest assured, I am a proud patriot who “Backs the Blue!”

CDN:

Are there any particular moments or memories that stand out for you at a political rally, event, or action?

Kuulume:

Yes, there is. In 2013 I joined Starr Parker and others in a “March for Life” that took us across the historic Edmund Pettis bridge (Selma, Alabama). This march took place a year following the tragic death of Tonya Reeves, a victim of a botched abortion at a Chicago Planned Parenthood clinic.   https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2177534/Tonya-Reaves-Familys-fury-woman-24-dies-operating-table-abortion.html

CDN:

What would you say to someone considering becoming a Republican? Is there a personal cost?

Kuulume:

Stand by your convictions. Many people are Conservative but don’t realize it because of the negative label associated with it. When you make a stand, realize that you may lose financial assets, family members, social status and more. It is also likely that you will be picked on and ridiculed. But this country is worth the price it takes to preserve its liberties and freedoms. We who share the same values must be courageous enough to stand together. Benjamin Franklin once said: “We all need to hang in there together, or we’ll all hang separately.”

CDN:

Is there an achievement, accomplishment or contribution that you’re most proud of?

Kuulume:

Yes: My military service. I entered the Navy and followed a long tradition of military service by my family members. My family preaches service to God and country. When I decided to enlist, my family was excited. I chose the career field of Hospital Corpsman (medic). This photo was taken in 1993, not long after I had graduated from Hospital Corpsman school. I’m pictured here with one of my former instructors. I loved being a Hospital Corpsman. I worked with the Marine Corps for 7 years. My duty station was Camp Pendleton, CA. My uniform was primarily camouflage and fatigues. I rarely wore the Navy working uniform.

Kuulume Stephens, Justice Lee, Republican, Black, Navy Graduation

Graduation from Navy Hospital Corpsman school

CDN:

What attracted you to become a Service Officer for veterans?

Kuulume:

With my being a Navy veteran, I still have a desire of service to our country. Veterans need counselors and advisors who can help them in matters as they transition to civilian life. I will always have the attitude of: “Pay it forward” in service to others.

 Kuulume Stephens, Black Conservative, Justice Lee, Veteran Service Officer

Kuulume serves as a Veterans Service Officer (VSO

CDN:

Many who have explored your Facebook page have found pictures of you with horses. Can you tell us about that?

Kuulume:

My Great grandparents were good friends with a Black cowboy (Edward J. Brooks) who changed his name to Edward Keeylocko. He was a U.S. Korean & Vietnam era veteran who constructed the western Cowtown Keeylocko (outside of Tucson, AZ) in the mid 1960’s. Keeylocko and my Great grandparents came from the same era and had the same type of views.

Kuulume Stephens, Black Conservative, Justice Lee, Cowboy

Edward Keeylocko

I spent a lot of time out at the Keeylocko ranch growing up, and he became a second Grandfather to me. He taught me a lot about the history of the Black Cowboys and the role they played in history, because it has been forgotten and it is not taught in schools. His dream was to keep that alive, and I’m doing my best to honor his wishes.

Here’s an excerpt from his biography:

“After experiencing racial discrimination from white ranchers when

he brought his herd to auction in the 1970’s, he built his own town

as a place to market his cattle and as a tribute to the western way

of life. Edward Keeylocko passed away at age 87 (in 2019).”

Over time, the town was built up to become a tourist attraction. It accommodates weddings, has a shooting range, restaurant, bar & saloon, as well as a self sufficient generator and water supply. I and others have volunteered to help keep Edward Keeylocko’s legacy going by giving time and effort to help the town. Mr. Keeylocko died in 2019.

CDN:

Tell us about your family.

Kuulume:

I have a son and a daughter, and also raise five step-children (3 boys, 2 girls), and 2 nieces.

CDN:

What is your biggest concern about America today?

Kuulume:

Decline in morality and basic family values. The family is the bedrock of society, and it is crumbling rapidly. Everything hinges on the strength of the basic family unit. We need to get back to basic morality by going on our knees and seeking the LORD.

CDN:

You have been a model, and many have commented that you are fairly attractive. Is there a down side to your attractiveness online?

Kuulume:

For the most part, the compliments have been cordial and welcomed. But I occasionally hear from weirdos who have absolutely NO CIVILITY. Their comments are over the top, insulting, lewd and unwelcomed. When I hear from them, I block them immediately… no warning. There are times when someone carries their mental instability too far. Back in 2013, I encountered a stalker, and had to get legal relief. He was arrested, and served jail time for a couple of years; his actions were that bad!

CDN:

You have a regular Facebook page as well as a fan page. Where can fans or interested parties reach you on social media or on the web?

Kuulume:

All they need to do is type: “@ModelJusticeLee” in the Google search. That should bring them to several links to my fan page links. By the way, my name is pronounced: “KOO-LOO-ME.”

CDN:

Ms. Stephens (Kuulume), on behalf of the multitude of readers at COMMDIGINEWS, thank you once again for taking time out of your very busy schedule to give us this interview.

Kuulume:

You’re welcome; it was my pleasure.

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Read more from Bill Randall on Communities Digital News

Bill Randall

Bill was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, in the neighborhood known as the Lower Ninth Ward. His U.S. Navy career spanned from August 1974 through January 2002, during which he had a decorated and distinguished span of honorable service. His profession and specialty was Earth Science (Meteorology, Oceanography and Geodesy). After retiring from active duty on January 1, 2002, he entered the private sector as an Independent Insurance Agent (AFLAC) and garnered recognition as a top performer as a new member. Shortly thereafter he earned his B.S. degree in Business Management, and later earned his MBA degree. He has also earned Information Technology (IT) Certification from Wake Technical Community College (May 2013). Bill worked for the Department of Veterans Affairs at the Milwaukee VA Pension Center (2002 –2005), processing hundreds of benefits claims for veterans and their family members. Bill subsequently relocated and served on the staff of a local church in Pensacola, FL (May – Dec 2005), and then accepted a business opportunity as a Generalist with a major Management Consulting Firm (2006 – 2008). In 2010 he started and now owns a private Management Consulting company, which is now based in Phoenix, AZ. He once ran for Chairman of the North Carolina Republican Party (June 2009). He has also twice run for U.S Congress (NC-13th Congressional district), winning the GOP nomination in the 2010 Primary, and losing in the GOP Primary in 2012. Bill was a teacher (elementary, middle and high school), teaching English Language Arts, Geometry and Physics from July 2014 through December 2018. He is author of the book “Examining God’s Purposes for Fasting and Prayer” (Author House, 2005), and is a full time Evangelist. Bill has a son, four daughters and four grandchildren.