Skip to main content

Jeff Sessions offers a teachable moment for GOP cowards

Written By | May 12, 2020
Jeff Sessions

Sen. Jeff Sessions poses with Muppets. Photo: Office of Senator Jeff Sessions. US government photo, in the public domain. Via Wikimedia Commons

WASHINGTON — You remember Jeff Sessions, don’t you? He’s the former US Attorney General who recused himself from overseeing the Justice Department’s bogus Russia collusion investigations. He did so to avoid the “appearance” of partisan obstruction as defined by the Democratic leadership in Congress and the moral paragons in the press.

Jeff Sessions at his 2017 Senate confirmation hearing for US Attorney General. Photo: The White House.

GOP cowards

But Sessions also abdicated his responsibilities at Justice to comply with the wishes of nervous Republicans, then in control of Congress.

As reported by POLITICO:

“Rep. Darrell Issa – who as chair of the House Oversight Committee launched approximately 24,598 investigations of Obama administration malfeasance – called for Sessions to recuse himself from looking into charges of Russian meddling in American campaigns. The committee’s current chair, Jason Chaffetz, did the same. So did Rep. Raúl Labrador, one of the leaders of the House Freedom Caucus, the most militant of conservative voices… Republicans can’t possibly know how deep the Trump-Russia rabbit hole goes, so it would be risky to stick out their necks for a president who – to put it charitably – has acted really strangely toward Moscow.”




Jeff Sessions’ abdication placed the entire Justice Department apparatus in the hands of Obama administration holdovers. Namely figures like FBI Director James Comey, FBI Counterintelligence chief Peter Strzok, Assistant Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, and Bush/Obama holdover Robert Mueller.

Obama’s minions
Russian 13, Jeff Sessions recusal

Assistant Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Screen capture.

Rod Rosenstein, you may recall, appointed former FBI Director Robert Mueller to serve as Special Counsel to investigate President Trump and his administration for the following grab back of purposes.

“… any links and/or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated with the campaign of President Donald Trump; and any matters that arose or may arise directly from that investigation…”

That information exerpts a portion of the recently declassified memo by Rosenstein outlining the true scope of Mueller’s Russia probe. As is clear for all to see, the scope is very broad. It looks more like a fishing expedition than a targeted investigation into a specified list of alleged crimes.


Also Read: Obama, Biden “worried” their Deep State Gestapo is done and over

Among the memo’s investigative targets we find the usual suspects, like Paul Manafort, George Papadopolous, and Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn. And as we all know, the allegations of “Russia collusion” focused entirely on unverified claims made in the anti-Trump dossier authored by British spy Christopher Steele. And again as we know, that document was created on behalf of Washington opposition research firm Fusion GPS, the Democratic National Committee, and the Hillary Clinton presidential campaign.

Jeff Sessions recusal

British spy Christopher Steele. CBS News screen capture.

Lacking an investigative basis

But now, as the Justice Department said in its May 7 dismissal of Gen. Flynn’s guilty plea for “lying to the FBI,” the case against him lacks a true legal basis.

“The Government is not persuaded that the January 24, 2017 interview was conducted with a legitimate investigative basis and therefore does not believe Mr. Flynn’s statements were material even if untrue. Moreover, we do not believe that the Government can prove either the relevant false statements or their materiality beyond a reasonable doubt.”

This lack of a “legitimate investigative basis” goes directly to the heart of every Federal prosecution and conviction associated with Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s two-year investigation of fictitious Russia collusion. These convictions, as the Justice Department said of Flynn, are “no longer justifiably predicated.”

Scared GOP rabbits

Which brings us back to Jeff Sessions. As a long-time Republican member of the United States Senate, Sessions was conditioned to worry about every accusation leveled against him by his Democratic colleagues and their propogandists in the press. Such accusations often prove fatal to members of the GOP, because the Democrats and their media lackeys team up to destroy them while always withholding “exculpatory evidence.”

As a result, Sessions, like his fellow congressional Republicans, suffers from a form of Stockholm Syndrome. Britannica.com defines this syndrome as follows.



“…  [a] psychological response wherein a captive begins to identify closely with his or her captors, as well as with their agenda…”

As the POLITICO story quoted earlier shows, Republicans lined up like shooting gallery ducks to support Sessions’ cowardly recusal. This set the stage for the Russia collusion quagmire, the loss of the GOP House majority in 2018, and Trump’s subsequent impeachment and Senate trial.

Speaking of impeachment, President Trump, unsurprisingly, proved his own best advocate, refusing to follow the advice of GOP pols and conservative intellectualoids that he remain silent and above the fray. Unlike them, Trump refuses to recuse himself from political combat – and reality.

Away down South in Dixie
Jeff Sessions

Jeff Sessions’ Alabama Senate ad. Fox News screen capture.

Speaking of reality, Sessions recently got a big dose of it from Trump’s re-election campaign. Hoping to win back his old Alabama Senate seat, Sessions has been campaigning in the Heart of Dixie, telling folks about his close and friendly association with the president he betrayed. Needless to say, that did not sit well with Michael Glassner, executive director of Trump’s 2020 Re-election campaign.

In a letter to Sessions, Glassner wrote:

“We only assume your campaign is doing this to confuse President Trump’s loyal supporters in Alabama into believing the president supports your candidacy in the upcoming primary run-off election. Nothing could be further from the truth.”

Trump instead endorsed Sessions’ GOP Senate primary challenger and popular former Auburn University football coach, Tommy Tuberville. The president tweeted that Tuberville will never let “MAGA/KAG, or our Country, down!”

Trump and the GOP

President Donald Trump wearing a MAGA hat. Photo: Gage Skidmore via Wikipedia, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Donald_Trump_(25953705015).jpg.

Trump owes Jeff Sessions nothing. And come to think of it, he doesn’t owe a whole hell of a lot to the many Republicans who supported the Sessions recusal and remained eerily silent throughout the Russia collusion ruse.

Throughout his presidency, Trump has stood alone. That’s because he is a fighter in a party comprised mostly of frightened rabbits. The grassroots party faithful find it hard to believe that today’s limp GOP was once the party of Abraham Lincoln.

If Trump wins this November, he must make a choice when it comes to Election 2024. Does he stay loyal to a party whose establishment sycophants fear their Democratic colleagues and the media? Or does he follow the tradition set by Jeff Sessions by recusing himself from their inept enterprise?

Perhaps he’d do well to form his own Keep America Great Party and extend the Trump Derangement Syndrome of his enemies in Washington, Hollywood, and the press throughout the 21st century. And beyond.

Anti-Trump demonstrator screams as Trump takes oath of office. YouTube screen capture.

********************************************************************************************************************

Top Images: Sen. Jeff Sessions poses with Muppets. Photo: Office of Senator Jeff Sessions.
US government photo, in the public domain. Via Wikimedia Commons

 

Steven M. Lopez

Originally from Los Angeles, Steven M. Lopez has been in the news business for more than thirty years. He made his way around the country: Arizona, the Bay Area and now resides in South Florida.