ALLEN WEST: Blacks failing to attain King’s Dream, to reach the mountaintop

11
2450
Lyndon Johnson and Martin Luther King - Historical photo - public domain
Lyndon Johnson and Martin Luther King - Historical photo - public domain

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRIF4_WzU1w[/youtube]

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Florida , January 20, 2014 – It pains me to say this, but the dream of Dr. Martin Luther King has not been attained, and as a matter of fact, we are in danger of seeing it lost forever.

Today’s black community finds itself trapped in inner cities that are crumbling all around them. The community suffers from chronic unemployment across the board, and especially among teens. As wages are depressed for middle America, the problem is far more exacerbated in the black community. Education, once a staple in the black community, struggles under the desires of teachers’ unions versus greater opportunities for black children. High school graduation rates for black males are barely 50 percent.

Sure, we have a black president, but don’t forget, he’s the one who cancelled the Washington, DC school voucher program for deserving black children – and recently the Department of Justice has set its sights on Louisiana’s school voucher program. Why would President Barack Obama tell black kids they don’t deserve a better education, a chance, while his own daughters head off to Sidwell Friends?


Once upon a time the Democrat party stood outside the doors preventing black children from receiving equal access to a quality education. Today the Democrat party stands inside the doors and prevents the same children, generations later, from seeking equal access to a quality education.

Certainly not in concert with Dr. King’s dream.

Republican Senator Everett Dirksen fought hard to enable the passage of civil legislation in opposition to Democrats such as Al Gore Sr. and Robert Byrd, a high-ranking KKK member. Since Reconstruction, the GOP had fought for civil rights legislation. However, all credit went to President Lyndon Baines Johnson who is rumored to have stated, “I’ll have those n—–s voting Democratic for the next 200 years.”

And as we reevaluate the “Great Society” and Johnson’s expansion of the welfare nanny-state, we see the negative results for the black community. Most obvious is the result of awarding a government check to women having children out of wedlock – as long as they kept a man out of the home. Today we see a national out-of-wedlock birth rate up from 6 percent 40 years ago to 42 percent today – tragically, 72 percent in the black community.

Today of course is the national observance of the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., a fellow Atlanta native.  As a matter of fact, I grew up in the same inner city neighborhood as Dr. King and my elementary school, Our Lady of Lourdes, sits right there across from his final resting place and the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Last week, I was back Washington DC, riding the METRO and I began to think back on my old neighborhood, and what I was seeing on the METRO. There were lots of single black women ushering their children along, but their husbands, their men, have been replaced by the government. That was certainly not the case in the black community in which I grew up, that of Dr. King.

I see a black community devoid of men. The incarceration rates are astounding and the level of criminality is unconscionable. The murder rate in the black community is depleting the community of a generation of young men. As well, I see young black men surrendering their manhood for something popular culture has deemed cool and trendy.

Certainly not in concert with Dr. King’s dream.

I see a black community devoid of principled leaders. It is a community that has uplifted charlatans and impostors who value their own standing and self-interest, not that of their community. The inner cities need an economic revitalization, one that stresses economic growth and opportunity. Instead, the modern American inner city is characterized by economic servitude and dependency — a recipe for failure. We have seen the results of failed liberal progressive black leadership in Detroit. How many more Detroits must we experience before the black community listens to others?

Some will say Dr. King was an advocate for social justice. I respond by saying Dr. King was an advocate for equality of opportunity, not equality of outcomes. He wanted a level playing field and policies that enabled blacks to be able to compete. He certainly did not want policies that usurped the will and determination of a community that achieved so much greatness in the face of so much adversity.

There will be many speeches today and lots of rhetoric, but will these words be intended to inspire? Or are they intended to anesthetize and keep the black community in a coma, a vegetative state of inertia and not the attainment of the dream of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2014 Communities Digital News

• The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or management of Communities Digital News.

This article is the copyrighted property of the writer and Communities Digital News, LLC. Written permission must be obtained before reprint in online or print media. REPRINTING CONTENT WITHOUT PERMISSION AND/OR PAYMENT IS THEFT AND PUNISHABLE BY LAW.

Correspondingly, Communities Digital News, LLC uses its best efforts to operate in accordance with the Fair Use Doctrine under US Copyright Law and always tries to provide proper attribution. If you have reason to believe that any written material or image has been innocently infringed, please bring it to the immediate attention of CDN via the e-mail address or phone number listed on the Contact page so that it can be resolved expeditiously.

  • bikerdogred1

    Blacks haven’t got out of the ditch and King wanted them on the mountain tops,it’s not I had a dream it is Keep Dreaming.

  • Paul Deckelman

    Well said, Colonel!

  • KMc1964

    What I, as a white man, really want to know is simple…what is it
    exactly that the black community, and specifically the black ‘leaders’
    like Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, and Julian Bond all want from white
    people? Do they want us in servitude? Do they want us to pay big bucks
    and support black people as restitution for slavery? I really WANT to
    know…maybe that is part of the problem…no one really knows what they
    want from us and thus no real dialogue can take place.
    I work with several black men and women and they all have had
    equal opportunity for promotion and advancement in the company. Some
    have gone after it, others have not (no different than white people).
    So again I ask…what is it that will make the black community happy?
    (by the way, no amount of laws can force people to not be racist – and
    there are already plenty of laws out there to ‘level’ the playing field
    for all races, so what is it?)

  • KMc1964

    What I, as a white man, really want to know is simple…what is it
    exactly that the black community, and specifically the black ‘leaders’
    like Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, and Julian Bond all want from white
    people? Do they want us in servitude? Do they want us to pay big bucks
    and support black people as restitution for slavery? I really WANT to
    know…maybe that is part of the problem…no one really knows what they
    want.
    I work with several black men and women and they all have had
    equal opportunity for promotion and advancement in the company. Some
    have gone after it, others have not (no different than white people).
    So again I ask…what is it that will make the black community happy?
    (by the way, no amount of laws can force people to not be racist – and
    there are already plenty of laws out there to ‘level’ the playing field
    for all races, so what is it?)

    • Victoria Mclaughlin

      Great Question! I too would like an a answer!

  • Scotty Thiel

    Allen West should have been the 1st black president…. then we might have been close to MLKs dream instead close to losing it all together,,,

  • Carrie Geren Scoggins

    MY LETTER THANKING BEATY HARDWARE FOR SHARING POST HONORING DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.:
    I wanted to add that I appreciate your Martin Luthar King post, I am a racial minority, Cherokee, and I have suffered a lot of discrimination in my lifetime. As a pre teen in Florida I was mistaken for a Hispanic student, and had people heckle me, throw rocks at me, and harass me. Later humiliated by Ms. Frazier at Bradley Jr. pointing out in front of the whole class Native Americans are not United States citizens, just after the subject came up in the classroom that I am a Cherokee on the Lee registry. Glad I did not mention that I have some African Americans in our family… don’t know how bad they could have attacked me. My grandmother Irene Geren, was brought in the back door years ago, and told that since she was dark, “Indian” she would have to go in through the back. I put up with my x in-laws, Shirley Scoggins, making racist statements and saying how horrible that Native Americans were that their reservations had “casinos,” which has become the going thing to harass us with, recently informants here in Murfreesboro called me an “angry squaw, knowing I am a Cherokee on the Lee registry of the Cherokee nation. I have heard all the outlandish stereotypes of “drunken Indians,” since a small minority of Natives had been caught with alcohol centuries back. Thanks again for your post! Carrie Geren Scoggins

  • rhh33672

    Blacks themselves have failed to go with MLK’s dream. They have created a nightmare within their own culture by being bought up by welfare, lack of motivation to study hard, always turn to “you are a racist” as a defense for their failures. If MLK was alive, he would be so ashamed what the black culture has become.
    I worked MLK parade today. When the parade ended, stupid thugs started to fight because the other thugs wore different color clothing. (Red vs Blue). They failed to realized that MLK was for acceptance, not internal fighting within black culture. Blacks have to realized that they are not that special that white wants to keep them down, they are keeping themselves down by always blaming the man instead of their own failures.

  • lokiswife

    I listened to MLK’s speeches on a business news program this morning and he did not tell blacks to sit on the couch and let someone else take care of them, he encouraged them to have a dream, to work for that dream. He saw a time when blacks and whites had equal chances for that dream and could work together. What happened? A government that tells them that they will take care of you, don’t bother seeking that dream. Forget about the mountaintop, we will feed you and provide housing and medical care….

  • John

    To be honest I agree with you most of the time sir. However I would like to point out that there are also deserving white, asian, and hispanic children that are trapped in the inner city and they are excluded from programs like this. My state has METCO and only children of color can apply. What this program has become is a bed of political privilege and nepotism. Where those who have political drag get there kids into the program and those that have kids in get the siblings in at the loss of others. And of course whites and asians and hispanics need not apply. I think we should be focusing on fixing the city schools and moving those kids who do well regardless of their skin into the better schools. To me that is what Dr. King meant when he said judged by the content of their character and not the color of their skin.

  • Pingback: ¥Ð¥ó¥º()