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Depression and stress could result in higher cases of mental health issues

Written By | May 19, 2020

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SAN DIEGO: Mental Health Awareness Month was first observed in 1949. Throughout the month of May, millions of Americans will participate in events, walks, and celebrations to highlight the importance of mental health. Part of the mission is to help reduce the stigmas that create barriers to diagnosis and treatment.

Depression and stress play a factor

Approximately 43.8 million adults have a mental health issue, with approximately 9 million adults, or 4 percent, having serious thoughts of suicide. Those that have troubled home lives may be more inclined to mental health issues as a result of the stay at home orders during the Covid-19 pandemic.  According to nami.org

“Depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide, and is a major contributor to the global burden of disease.” 

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, approximately 1 in 25 U.S. adults experience a serious mental illness each year which limits their ability to perform basic functions and tasks at home and at work.

Learn more about mental health
Mental Health

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There are a variety of mental health disorders and illnesses that are published in The National Institute of Mental Health, and represent some which are more commonly known.




Anxiety disorders
Attention Deficit disorders
Autism
Depression
Bipolar disorders
Eating disorders
Substance abuse disorders
Post-traumatic stress disorders
Schizophrenia

A mental health disorder may occur early or late in life and has the possibility of becoming ongoing or temporary depending upon its severity and access to proper treatment.


Read More from Laurie Edwards-Tate

Recognize the warning signs
High levels of worry and fear
Confusion
Insomnia
Overeating
Excessive alcohol intake
Substance abuse
Extreme changes in mood
Irritability
High blood pressure
Withdrawal socially
Suicidal thoughts

Given the personal, social, and economic impact created by the disability of people with untreated mental health disorders, it is imperative to seek immediate attention from a qualified mental health provider.

Tips to maintain mental health awareness

Mental Health

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To maintain the best possible mental health, or to get help getting back on track, Mental Health America offers the following tips on feeling better and growing stronger and more resilient.

Be certain to connect with other people
Stay positive
Get physically active
Help other people
Get enough sleep
Create joy
Eat well
Take care of spirit
Become more resilient
Seek professional help immediately
Mental Health

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Choosing to be happy and well is a gift and a right–choose mental health by celebrating Live Your Life Well throughout the month of May and the rest of your life.

Do not delay seeking treatment out of fear or stigma

The following contacts may provide direction to those seeking professional assistance.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255 (call 911 for an immediate emergency)

NAMI Helpline: https://www.nami.org/Find-Support/NAMI-HelpLine

Mental Health America: www.mentalhealthamerica.net/may

Until next time, enjoy the ride in good health!



 

Laurie Edwards-Tate

Since 1984, Laurie Edwards-Tate has served as President and Founder of At Your Home Familycare, a non-medical Home Care Aide Organization, serving seniors, disabled, infirm and children. Laurie is Board of Director 2018 (elected), Palomar Health; Executive Board Member; Chair Board Human Resources Committee; Member of Audits & Compliance Committee; Community Relations Committee.