New ‘Grantchester’ Season 3 to launch Sunday on PBS

Set in Cambridgeshire, England in the 1950s, UK detective series pairs hard-nosed cop with conflicted Anglican vicar. Goal: To solve perplexing murder mysteries.

0
549
Robson Green and James Norton filming "Grantchester" on Clare College Bridge, Cambridge. (PR still via Wikipedia entry on the series, CC 2.0 license)

WASHINGTON, June 17, 2017 – English murder mystery program “Grantchester” returns to American TV Sunday evening, June 18. The ongoing series is based on a series of short stories penned by British novelist and writer-of-all-trades, James Runcie.

Airing on most PBS stations at 9 p.m. ET, Season 3’s seven episodes will find the improbable pair of sometime-friends – rough-edged Detective Inspector (DI) Geordie Keating (Robson Green) and deeply-conflicted Anglican priest, Reverend Sidney Chambers (James Norton) – once again teaming up and butting heads once again to solve complex and troubling crimes in and around Cambridge and Cambridgeshire England in the 1950s.

Sunday evening’s debut will feature a special Christmas episode that was separately aired in the UK, in which, according to a PBS release,

“…an impossible situation distracts Sidney from his Christmas duties. Then, when a would-be groom is found dead with the wedding rings lodged in his mouth, Geordie is horrified: these are the hallmarks of a years-old unsolved murder.”


The new season’s remaining episodes continue to present perplexing mysteries for this unlikely duo to solve – a process further complicated by both Geordie and Sidney’s increasingly fraught romantic entanglements.

We missed the beginning pair of “Grantchester” seasons on PBS, but later caught up with the show via the magic of Amazon Prime, so we’re good to go with Sunday’s opening gambit.

If your viewing habits are like ours, which favor detailed, intricate, slow-paced English murder mysteries, whose tough solutions are doggedly pursued by eccentric and decidedly less-than-perfect detectives, this one’s for you.

James Norton’s prickly vicar, who once fought in the Second World War before finding – perhaps erroneously – his priestly vocation, offers an intriguingly astringent twist to this show as he manages to encounter personally more than one of the Seven Deadly Sins despite his current job title.

“Grantchester” Season 3 premieres on Sunday, June 18 at 9 p.m. on most PBS stations. It airs in the Washington, D.C. metro area on WETA-TV channel 26 and also on WETA HD. The channel offers a series preview video here.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 Communities Digital News

• The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or management of Communities Digital News.

This article is the copyrighted property of the writer and Communities Digital News, LLC. Written permission must be obtained before reprint in online or print media. REPRINTING CONTENT WITHOUT PERMISSION AND/OR PAYMENT IS THEFT AND PUNISHABLE BY LAW.

Correspondingly, Communities Digital News, LLC uses its best efforts to operate in accordance with the Fair Use Doctrine under US Copyright Law and always tries to provide proper attribution. If you have reason to believe that any written material or image has been innocently infringed, please bring it to the immediate attention of CDN via the e-mail address or phone number listed on the Contact page so that it can be resolved expeditiously.

SHARE
Previous articleSuperfly: Flyweight tournament of champions set September 9
Next articleRemembering those who died in the Grenfell Tower fire
Terry Ponick
Biographical Note: Dateline Award-winning music and theater critic for The Connection Newspapers and the Reston-Fairfax Times, Terry was the music critic for the Washington Times print edition (1994-2010) and online Communities (2010-2014). Since 2014, he has been the Business and Entertainment Editor for Communities Digital News (CDN). A former stockbroker and a writer and editor with many interests, he served as editor under contract from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and continues to write on science and business topics. He is a graduate of Georgetown University (BA, MA) and the University of South Carolina where he was awarded a Ph.D. in English and American Literature and co-founded one of the earliest Writing Labs in the country. Twitter: @terryp17