BREAKING: Mary Tyler Moore, TV legend, dead at 80

Diabetes, health issues took toll on feisty, popular actress, a fixture on small screens in the 1960s and 1970s in hit “Dick Van Dyke,” “Mary Tyler Moore” shows.

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Mary Tyler Moore attending the 1988 prime time Emmy Awards ceremony. (Image via Wikipedia entry on the actress, CC 2.5)

WASHINGTON, January 25, 2017 – Mary Tyler Moore, the irresistibly feisty female icon of 1960s and 1970s TV sitcom fame, has died at the age of 80 after battling health issues in recent years, some stemming from adult-onset Type 1 diabetes.

An updated Wikipedia entry on Moore provides further details:

“Moore was diagnosed with Type I diabetes when she was 33. In 2011, she had surgery to remove a meningioma, a benign brain tumor. In 2014 friends reported that she had heart and kidney problems and was nearly blind. In October 2015, Moore’s former co-star Dick Van Dyke said on an episode of Larry King Now, “‘[Diabetes] has taken a toll on her; she’s not well at all.’ She died on January 25, 2017, after she had been placed on a respirator the previous week.”

A release posted on Dateline posted a press release praising her life and career:


“‘A groundbreaking actress, producer, and passionate advocate for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Mary will be remembered as a fearless visionary who turned the world on with her smile,’ her publicist Mara Buxbaum said Wednesday. The website TMZ report4ed that Moore had died in a Connecticut hospital and may have spent as much as a week on a respirator before passing away.”

Moore first became a small screen fixture when she starred on the popular sitcom, “The Dick Van Dyke Show” (1961-1965) as Laura Petrie, the cute but often off-center wife of the show’s eponymous star who portrayed her husband Rob on this CBS-TV inside showbiz series.

She found even greater popularity a few seasons later, starring in her own headline sitcom series, “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” which also aired on CBS from 1970-1977, following the career of the youthful “Mary Richards,” as she joined the staff of a Minneapolis TV station chock full of loopy co-workers.

She and her co-stars became household names due to the show’s continuing popularity. Ed Asner, one of those co-stars, who played her ornery boss, Lou Grant, was even spun off on his own show (“The Lou Grant Show”), a serious hour-long drama about the newspaper biz, after “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” completed its run.

Asner and Moore remained professionally close, and he was one of the first to remember Moore via the Twitterverse.

Final arrangements for Mary Tyler Moore were not available at the time this article was written.

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