Botched! Returns for second season (2015)

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Botched
Botched

WASHINGTON, August 6, 2014  – We can all take a deep breath now as Botched, the reality show that is nothing short of a genuflect to the stupidity of vanity, returns for a second season. Show premise is that people have horrific plastic surgery procedures done to them giving them the ability to do things flip their butt implants around (why would you get butt implants to begin with?) and end up looking from odd to monstrous.

Doctors Terry Dubrow and Paul Nassif return for Season 2 to restore, fix, and adjust botched plastic surgery procedures. Show viewers watch the doctor’s repair horrific breast implants, face lifts, silicon implants and other oddities caused by doctors with patients willing to go under the knife, all too often for vanity.

What is the truly most amazing part of this show is how vain the patients can be, and how patient the doctors are. One has to wonder how often they want to scream “what the heck were you thinking?”

The first season of Botched showed the results of 20 surgeries, ranging from nose jobs to altering a “uniboob.” The network says that thousands of people have submitted their stories for the second season, including a former professional athlete in need of facial work, and a woman who contracted a flesh eating disease during surgery in Mexico.


 

The network says thousands of people have submitted their stories for the second season, including a former professional athlete in need of facial work, and a woman who contracted a flesh eating disease during surgery in Mexico.

From press releases:

The premiere season of Botched is currently pacing to be E!’s most-watched docu-series in the demo and in total viewers since 2011. Botched currently is averaging 1.54 million viewers and nearly 1 million demo viewers in its slot. The series notched its most-watched premiere ever this past Sunday: 1.7 million viewers.

New episodes of the show will roll out in 2015. In the meantime, here’s a segment from YouTube featuring the doctors, and as she is quick to remind all, the world’s first super model, Janet Dickenson. Did we mention the vanity factor?

Press releases contributed to this story

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  • Carla

    Yes, you mentioned the vanity factor. What mentioning vanity seems to do is to shift the accountability from the doctors, (U.S. Board Certified Plastic Surgeons, and others), and erroneously places it on patients.

    The public judgement placed upon patients – people who trusted their doctors – then continues to increase. This misappropriated increase in patient blame continues to shift more accountability away from doctors — doctors who we hope would embody a strong creed of ethics, and not abuse their position of public trust.

    People I know would like to see solid medical ‘standards of care’ replace the patient-bashing.

    Many patients get plastic and reconstructive surgeries based on what they feel is a need, for example:

    1. Female breast reconstruction for structural help
    2. Male breast reduction, (gynomastia), based on not wanting to have protuberant breasts
    3. Tummy tuck, (abdominoplasty), after pregnancy or other weight loss to remove excess skin

    Patients who went in for what they believed to be reasonable, prudent surgery, but had their Plastic Surgeons cross the line and not respect their wishes, (or treat their bodies without the caution and frugality they discussed and counted upon), would like to ask the doctors, “What the heck were you thinking?Yes, you mentioned the vanity factor. What mentioning vanity seems to do is to shift the accountability from the doctors, (U.S. Board Certified Plastic Surgeons, and others), and erroneously places it on patients.

    The public judgement placed upon patients – people who trusted their doctors – then continues to increase. This misappropriated increase in patient blame continues to shift more accountability away from doctors — doctors who we hope would embody a strong creed of ethics, and not abuse their position of public trust.

    People I know would like to see solid medical ‘standards of care’ replace the patient-bashing.

    Many patients get plastic and reconstructive surgeries based on what they feel is a need, for example:

    1. Female breast reconstruction for structural help
    2. Male breast reduction, (gynomastia), based on not wanting to have protuberant breasts
    3. Tummy tuck, (abdominoplasty), after pregnancy or other weight loss to remove excess skin

    Patients who went in for what they believed to be reasonable, prudent surgery, but had their Plastic Surgeons cross the line and not respect their wishes, (or treat their bodies without the caution and frugality they discussed and counted upon), would like to ask the doctors, “What the heck were you thinking?

  • Carla

    Yes, you mentioned the vanity factor. What mentioning vanity seems to do is to shift the accountability from the doctors, (U.S. Board Certified Plastic Surgeons, and others), and erroneously places it on patients.

    The public judgement placed upon patients – people who trusted their doctors – then continues to increase. This misappropriated increase in patient blame continues to shift more accountability away from doctors — doctors who we hope would embody a strong creed of ethics, and not abuse their position of public trust.

    People I know would like to see solid medical ‘standards of care’ replace the patient-bashing.

    Many patients get plastic and reconstructive surgeries based on what they feel is a need, for example:

    1. Female breast reconstruction for structural help
    2. Male breast reduction, (gynomastia), based on not wanting to have protuberant breasts
    3. Tummy tuck, (abdominoplasty), after pregnancy or other weight loss to remove excess skin

    Patients who went in for what they believed to be reasonable, prudent surgery, but had their Plastic Surgeons cross the line and not respect their wishes, (or treat their bodies without the caution and frugality they discussed and counted upon), would like to ask the doctors, “What the heck were you thinking?