Amazon Echo: Is Alexa ratting you out to the CIA?

If you interact regularly with Amazon Echo and Alexa, you might want to ask yourself, "Is Alexa working for me or is she working for the CIA?"

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Splash page via Amazon.com for Amazon's Echo device which responds to Alexa voice commands and queries. (Via Amazon.com website)

WASHINGTON, March 10, 2017 — Whether you’re for President Trump or against him, you can’t fail to have heard at least some of the buzz surrounding The Donald and The Russians. Did they, or didn’t they?

But far more alarming than this real—or fake—news was Wikileaks’ latest gift to the paranoid: a massive docu-dump detailing the ways in which elements of the U.S. intelligence community—as in the CIA and others—have been routinely eavesdropping on pretty much all of us, whether we’ve done anything suspicious or not.

Wikileaks’ documents detail the covert ways in which America’s increasingly hamfisted spooks can and do commandeer anything from our iPhones to our home and laptop computers to spy on our everyday conversations. Worse, the Feds can actually see what we’re up to at all times simply by commandeering the camera in one or more of our devices.

And that growing list of devices now includes our “smart TVs.” You think you’re watching your TV? Maybe your TV is watching you. It’s all pretty alarming. Can Big Brother be all that far away?


If you think about it, does the Federal government really have that all-important “need to know” when it comes to what we eat for dinner or what we do in our bedrooms for extra-curricular activities? Dubious at best.

Which brings us to one of the latest hot new devices on the market: Amazon Echo and its Siri-like virtual assistant, Alexa. If you interact regularly with Alexa, you might want to ask yourself, “Is Alexa working for me or is she working for the CIA?”

That’s a good question. International Business Times writer Tim Marcin digs deeper, looking for answers:

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