Mexican Border influx causing humanitarian and fiscal crisis in US

Mexican Border influx causing humanitarian and fiscal crisis in US

by -
6 2202
Border crossing sign
Border crossing sign

WASHINGTON, June 11, 2014 — America is the midst of fiscal and humanitarian crises thanks to the massive influx of refugees across the border.

Amnesty and an open border are a concern to most Americans. This is not just a political issue, but a humanitarian issue. Approximately 1,000 people a day are entering the U.S. illegally, many of them children or single women with children.

The women say they need to escape the spiraling violence taking over the countries of Central America and save their children from the bloodshed. There is the perception that children, and women with children, have an easier time obtaining permission to stay in the United States than single adults do.

READ ALSO: Eric Cantor’s loss is a victory for immigration patriots

Children, some younger than 5 years old, are being sent to the U.S. from Mexico, often without their parents. As many as 60,000 children have been transported across the border, according to some estimates.

America cannot support the sheer number of people are seeking to live, and consume benefits, in the U.S. This is creating a humanitarian crisis and budget dilemma, as President Obama and Congress struggle over what to do with this many children, all in need of food, medical care and housing.

CNN reports that adults who cross the border to America are being put on buses, moving them deeper into the U.S. in search of family. One mother with child was given bus passage from her entry point to El Paso and then Washington D.C., where she will join the millions of illegal immigrants living in limbo.

Adding to the crisis, the number of unaccompanied, undocumented immigrants who are under 18 is expected to more than double in 2015 to nearly 130,000 at a cost to U.S. taxpayers of $2 billion, up from $868 million this year, according to administration estimates.

In 2011, the number of children filtering into the U.S. was 6,000, a tenth of the number expected over the next year.

In April, Ann Coulter wrote, “The population of Texas is about 27 million. With amnestied illegal aliens allowed to bring in their cousins and brothers-in-law under our insane ‘family reunification’ policies, the 12 million illegal immigrants already here will quickly balloon to 30 million new voters — who happen to break 8-to-2 for the Democrats.”

The total illegal immigrant population is somewhere between 11 and 12 million. Opponents to amnesty are concerned that those illegal immigrants will prevent willing American workers and employers from finding each other as the option to hire cheap illegal workers.

READ ALSO: The hyphenated America: Non-Anglo population taking over USA

Recently protesters in Santa Ana, California picked up the cry, “We are here and we’re not going anywhere.”

“We just want some respect and human rights,” another Santa Ana protester told the Los Angeles Times.

“We’re fighting to give [immigrants] equal rights,” said a marcher in Riverside, California

Those who support amnesty insist that U.S. Immigration Laws, the laws on the ‘’books,” must fall simply because this large group of immigrants and their supporters say so.

Widespread contempt for America’s law is grating to those who respect and obey the law, and it is one of the first tenets of the debate that creates a hostile conversation between those for and against.

Then there is the argument over whether Hispanics bring value to the U.S. writer Nataly Kelly reports in her article, Seven Surprising Ways Immigration Helps Build a Stronger America that immigration fuels the U.S. economy, creates job, brings us global talent, make us less globally isolated, creates multilingualism, brings new ideas to America and helps shape the world view of America.

Illegitimacy among Hispanics is rising. Half of all children born to Hispanic Americans in 2002 were to one parent families, 42 percent higher than the overall American rate.

The CDC reported in 2013 that over half of Hispanic births are born to unmarried mothers:

In 2010, 40.8 percent of all births were to unmarried women. This level compares with 33.2 percent in 2000 and 18.4 percent in 1980 . Within age groups, 88 percent of births to teenagers and 63 percent of births to women aged 20–24 were non-marital. One in five births to women aged 30 and over were to unmarried women. The proportions of non-marital births vary widely among population sub­ groups.

In 2010, these proportions were 17 percent for API, 29 percent for non-Hispanic white, 53 percent for Hispanic, 66 percent for Asian, and 73 percent for non-Hispanic black births.

According to a 2013 Census Bureau report, nationwide, African-American women reported the highest rate of out-of-wedlock births, at 67.8 percent. American Indian or Alaska Native women reported a 64 percent rate, while Hispanics reported 43 percent and non-Hispanic whites reported 26 percent. Asian-Americans reported the lowest rate of out-of-wedlock births, at 11.3 percent.

Academically, the Hispanic high school drop out rate has the Americanized Hispanic youth joining gangs and engaging in illegal activities. The LA Unified School District is 73 percent Hispanic, and in this District, only 40 percent of the Hispanic students graduate.

Nationwide, 53 percent of Hispanics graduate, the lowest rate of all ethnic groups according Jay Green of the Manhattan Institute.

The NCLR Statistical Brief (2007) reports that High school dropout rate are particularly high for 16-to 24 year old foreign born Latinos.

Foreign-born Hispanic dropouts account for 25.3 percent of all dropouts in the United States. In 2004, the status dropout rate of Hispanic 16-to-24-year-olds born outside of the Untied States was 38.4 percent, which is significantly higher than the status dropput rate for first-generation Hispanics of the same age group (14.7 percent). Latinos who are second-generation or great drop out at a rate of 13.7 percent, which is slightly lower than for first-generation Latinos.

Lack of education, criminal activity and out of wedlock births increases the chances of poverty among Hispanics. From 1990 to 2004, the number of Hispanics in poverty rose 52 percent, with Hispanic children in poverty rising 43 percent.

The anticipated influx of children from Mexico and Central America will no doubt increase those numbers.

The number of poor Hispanic children rose by 43 percent, reports Washington Post columnist Robert Samuelson. By contrast, the number of poor black children has declined 17 percent since 1990. This latest influx of dirt-poor Mexican children will drive higher rates of Hispanic poverty.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2014 Communities Digital News

This article is the copyrighted property of the writer and Communities Digital News, LLC. Written permission must be obtained before reprint in online or print media. REPRINTING CONTENT WITHOUT PERMISSION AND/OR PAYMENT IS THEFT AND PUNISHABLE BY LAW.

Correspondingly, Communities Digital News, LLC uses its best efforts to operate in accordance with the Fair Use Doctrine under US Copyright Law and always tries to provide proper attribution. If you have reason to believe that any written material or image has been innocently infringed, please bring it to the immediate attention of CDN via the e-mail address or phone number listed on the Contact page so that it can be resolved expeditiously.