Lombok, Indonesia: Eden on the Indian Ocean

Lombok is like stepping back in time where peasants still work the rice fields just as they have for centuries. Given that Lombok is still new to tourism, wi-fi can be tricky, English is readily spoken and ATMs are easily accessible.

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Thatched roof building on a busy street in Lombok (Taylor)

LOMBOK, INDONESIA, April 16, 2016 – Lombok? It doesn’t quite roll off the tongue like Hawaii or Santorini or St. Barts, but for travelers who enjoy being on the cutting edge of new travel destinations, Lombok, Indonesia may just be the place.

Quinci Villas resort on Lombok Island (Taylor)
Quinci Villas resort on Lombok Island (Taylor)

In fact, for people who want to visit paradise on the cheap, Lombok IS the place.

Add in Lombok’s growing reputation as one of the best surfing destinations in the world and it’s a tough combination to beat.

Situated across the Lombok Strait roughly 25 miles from Bali, Lombok benefits as a secondary destination for visitors to its bigger sister. Today, however, it is coming into its own as a popular place to get away from it all without spending an arm and a leg to do it.


Lombok is roughly circular shaped with a tail. Imagine an oversized sting ray.

Other than Mount Rinjani, the second largest volcano in Indonesia, there is not much to see in Lombok except magnficent beaches, superb local crafts and an abundance of sunshine.

Pristine beach in Kuta on Lombok Island (Taylor)
Pristine beach in Kuta on Lombok Island (Taylor)

For the moment, prices are inexpensive. A seaview room at the Sheraton in Sengigi goes for about $80 per night. Gradually new boutique resorts are popping up throughout the island as travelers are “discovering” Lombok as a destination in its own right.

Food ranges from international to Indonesian to Mediterranean, but it is also easy to find European dishes as well. An excellent meal including drinks may cost $30 tops.

Young weaver at work (Taylor)
Young weaver at work (Taylor)

Lombok markets itself, if you can call it marketing, as an “unspoiled alternative to Bali.” Though the term “unspoiled” is accurate, “roughing it” in Lombok is not exactly a Robinson Crusoe experience. Beaches are uncrowded and plentiful.

So far, other than snorkeling and surfing, the myriad of water sports that have invaded other resort areas in the world have not yet reached Lombok. Rather, this is a place to “chill” in the sun.

Most of the better resorts have excellent spa facilities where a 90-minute Balinesian massage costs about $40.

Wood carving is one of the specialty crafts of the island (Taylor)
Wood carving is one of the specialty crafts of the island (Taylor)

Lombok has two golf courses, but it is hardly St. Andrews, so links lovers would do better to leave the clubs at home unless schlepping your bag is something you just cannot escape.

A car with driver and guide will take you around the island for approximately $40 per person. Keep in mind that driving is on the left side of the road, and while there is not a lot of traffic on Lombok compared to Bali, the mopeds and other vehicles can be a challenge. Better to “leave the driving to them.”

Baskets and other woven crafts are good quality (Taylor)
Baskets and other woven crafts are good quality (Taylor)

Lombok, like Bali, is a shopper’s paradise. Cloth weaving, Batik, wood carvings and basket weaving are high quality, especially if you have a good guide who knows where to go. Be prepared to barter. That’s the name of the game.

Indonesia is primarily Muslim, which means that Lombok is subject to early morning and late evening calls to prayer that can be annoying for travelers who like to sleep in.

Working the rice fields in the traditional way (Taylor)
Working the rice fields in the traditional way (Taylor)

In many ways, Lombok is like stepping back in time where peasants still work the rice fields just as they have for centuries and local transportation in most villages is by horse drawn “carriages” known as “Lombok limousines.”

Locals often get around in a "Lombok limo" (Taylor)
Locals often get around in a “Lombok limo” (Taylor)

Given that Lombok is still new to tourism, wi-fi can be tricky at times, but it is available and, besides, what else are you going to do all day?

English is readily spoken and ATMs are easily accessible though the conversion rate may trip you up at first since 1,300,000 Indonesian rupiah is about $100.

Do not travel with friends from PETA because cock-fighting, though illegal, is a popular sport in many villages.

Cock fighting is illegal but still popular in many villages (Wikipedia)
Cock fighting is illegal but still popular in many villages (Wikipedia)

Little is known about the history of Lombok before the 17th century. Until that time, the island was comprised of small warring states each of which was ruled by a Sasak prince. Today the 3.1 million inhabitants of Lombok are 85% Sasak whose ancestors are believed to have migrated from Java in the first millennium BC.

Room at Quinci Villas -- may just be your last resort (Taylor)
Room at Quinci Villas — may just be your last resort (Taylor)

Rebellious millennials hoping to seek refuge in paradise should know that a top job in one of the resorts only pays about $8 a day. Talk about “minimum” wage.

For now, most visitors arrive from Australia and the UK partly because the distance for Americans is considerable. On the other hand, U.S. travelers seeking a truly comfortable, relaxing, inexpensive destination may want to consider Lombok.

Beach and pool at Quinci Villas Resort outside of Sengigi (Taylor)
Beach and pool at Quinci Villas Resort outside of Sengigi (Taylor)

After all, the biggest decision you will have to make after breakfast is whether to swim in the pool or the Indian Ocean.

Just head to Bali and look for a giant sting ray.

Contact Bob at Google+

About the Author: Bob Taylor is a veteran writer who has traveled throughout the world. Taylor was an award winning television producer/reporter/anchor before focusing on writing about international events, people and cultures around the globe.
He is founder of The Magellan Travel Club (www.MagellanTravelClub.com).

His goal is to visit 100 countries or more during his lifetime.

Read more of Travels with Peabod and Bob Taylor at Communities Digital News

Follow Bob on Twitter @MrPeabod

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