Trump Mexican border policy angers Vicente Fox and friends

Former Mexican President Vicente Fox was livid, “I’m not going to pay for that f***ing wall,” he told Jorge Ramos of Fusion television. “He should pay for it.”

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Former Mexican President Vincente Fox. (Image via Wikipedia, CC 3.0 license courtesy Agência Brasil)

WASHINGTON, February 26, 2016 — Former Mexican President Vicente Fox was livid, “I’m not going to pay for that f***ing wall,” he told Jorge Ramos of Fusion television. “He should pay for it.”

The “he” Fox referred to is GOP presidential front runner Donald J. Trump. Note that Fox believes Trump’s pledge to build a wall on America’s southern border will cost him personally.

Fox gives the impression that by preventing his nation’s human-smugglers and drug mules from crossing our border illegally, Trump might seriously impact his personal wealth, estimated to be $10 million – that we know of.

Head of the Sinaloa drug cartel, Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.
Head of the Sinaloa drug cartel, Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.
GOP presidential candidate Donald J. Trump.
GOP presidential candidate Donald J. Trump.

Remember a certain drug lord with a penchant for escaping Mexico’s maximum-security lockups? The one that hobnobs with the likes of Academy Award-winning actor Sean Penn? The guy whose criminal organization received thousands of weapons from the Obama administration courtesy of Operation Fast and Furious?


That man, of course, is the Sinaloa Cartel’s head honcho, Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.

It’s alleged Guzman established a cozy relationship with Fox when the latter served as governor of Guanajuato State, one of thirteen Mexican states within the cartel’s territory.

So Fox’s election as Mexico’s president in 2000 was a major win for the cartels.

“It was said that the then president [Vicente Fox] had received a bribe worth $40 million in exchange for providing political protection for El Chapo’s escape [from prison]. But Fox’s alleged involvement didn’t stop there… the Fox presidency had provided protection to Guzman and the Sinaloa Cartel throughout its six years in office,” writes Anabel Hernandez in her book “The Mexican Drug Lords and Their Godfathers.”

When Hernandez was interviewed by Vice’s Sam Clements, she said,

“Ever since the 1960s, the [Mexican] federal government provided protection to all the cartels… In January of 2001, something happened that changed the drug cartel game: the federal government helped El Chapo to get out of jail. So in that moment, the federal government started to protect just one cartel and fight against the others, which is when the war between the cartels started… it was Vincente Fox who really started the cartel wars. His government wanted to take the Gulf Cartel’s territory and let the Sinaloa Cartel keep it.”

Last July, a report issued by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) said, “The Sinaloa Cartel maintains the most significant presence in the United States. They are dominant along the West Coast, through the Midwest and into the Northeast… and is also responsible for the majority of heroin.”

DEA map shows the Sinaloa Cartel’s major control of the illegal drug market in the U.S.
DEA map shows the Sinaloa Cartel’s major control of the illegal drug market in the U.S.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, heroin use in the U.S. has nearly doubled, with 8,200 Americans dying from heroin overdoses in 2013 alone.

When El Chapo escaped prison for a third time last July, he took to Twitter and sent a message to the single U.S. presidential candidate determined to stop the flow of illegal immigration, “If you keep pissing me off, I’m going to make you eat your words, you f***ing blond $#@%&,” El Chapo told Donald Trump.

So it’s understandable that El Chapo’s friend Fox is so fast and furious in response to Trump’s call for Mexico’s corrupt government to pay for his proposed wall. A secure southern border is bad for business – namely, the Sinaloa Cartel’s illegal drug and human-trafficking business.

A business that was so instrumental in building the wealth of former Mexican President Vicente Fox.

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