Traveling on the Dangerous Faggot Tour, Milo melts college snowflakes

When Milo comes to town it is aboard his own tour bus, boldly emblazoned with “DANGEROUS FAGGOT TOUR” as he engages delicate snowflake students on every level of their social and cultural so-called orientation.

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Colorado Springs , Colo. – Brit Milo Yiannopoulos, an openly, flamboyantly gay and conservative raconteur, once again is invading American college campuses to deliver free speech over the objections of easily offended college “snowflakes” and their leftist professors.

Here’s how his own conservative newspaper, Breitbart News, announced its senior editor’s trip around the nation, “Suck It Up Buttercups: Dangerous Faggot Tour Returns To Colleges In September.”

When Milo comes to town it is aboard his own tour bus, boldly emblazoned with “DANGEROUS FAGGOT TOUR.” He engages delicate snowflake students on every level of their social and cultural so-called orientation.

He drives his tour bus metaphorically through students’ safe spaces, using every trigger word in the book, and a few outside of the book, to fight collegiate and societal censorship.


He engages delicate snowflake students on every level of their social and cultural so-called orientation.

The attractive Milo, with an open, seemingly innocent countenance, strides onstage in his sequined sports jacket, guarded by Navy Seals, and ready to do battle in America’s recent war on free speech.

He is engaging, funny, self-deprecating and as serious as a train wreck about what he sees as the regrettable decay of American’s First Amendment rights, beginning on college campuses.

It was another Brit who reminded us in 1906 of our own commitment to open discourse. Evelyn Beatrice Hall, 1868 – 1956, who wrote under the pseudonym S.G. Tallentyre, in “The Friends of Voltaire,” wrote the phrase:

“I disapprove of what you say but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”

Contrast Hall’s admonition with the observations in 2015 by Daily Beast author, Emily Shire in her article, “Victims and Microaggressions: Why 2015 Was The Year Students Lost Their Minds.”

“Before 2015, playing beer pong and pulling all-nighters were the activities most associated with the college experience. That all changed this year. A new lexicon to cover hot-button campus issues – “microaggressions,” “safe spaces,” and “yes means yes,” – entered the mainstream as college protests earned increasing national interest.“

Hall cites college sexual harassment and serious sexual assaults as the, pardon the expression, ‘trigger,’ for the war on words. What followed, she says, was “The Race to Rename: Furor Over Mascots, monuments, and Buildings”:

“Another lightning rod was the student-led campaigns to rename pretty much any hall, dorm, or mascot whose namesake would be considered racist, sexist, or culturally insensitive by 2015’s standards.”

“A wide range of properties and portraits were suddenly deemed offensive because students, apparently, hadn’t realized that revered Founding Fathers owned slaves, and that most beloved and wealthy Americans born before the 20th century did not treat women, homosexuals, and people of color with respect.”

Hall continues:

“Before 2015, “safe space” and “microaggressions” were terms that were almost unanimously foreign to anyone who hadn’t attended or worked in a liberal arts community. But “safe spaces” emerged as one of the most oft-repeated terms in the college protests . . . At Yale, a sophomore identified by the Daily Caller as Jerelyn Luther shouted at Nicholas Christakis, a professor and head of the dorm Siliman College, that his job was ‘not about creating an intellectual space,’ but about a ‘place of comfort and home,’ a variant on the ‘safe space’ ideal.”

Two years later, Milo confronts censorship head-on, by being objectionable and politically incorrect. He expresses his own shock, being a Brit, at the lengths Americans have taken to comply with the whines and so-called needs of the victim class. And he reserves the right to express his own offense to Americans’ offense at him.

Thus, in some sort of perverse round-Robin, Milo is showing his audiences that the very concept of “political correctness” becomes ridiculous and indefensible in the face of a free and open society.

Famed Austrian economist, Richard M. Ebeling, in his 2015 article, “The Tyranny of Trigger Words and College Safe Spaces,” addresses the matter politically:

“Totalitarians Wish to Control Words and Ideas for Power Over Others. Only in authoritarian or totalitarian societies are words, conceptions, and ideas banned, restricted or prohibited. It is done precisely to prevent people from expressing and conveying their thoughts on, especially, political, economic, social and philosophical ideas that those in power view as dangers to their own ideological and governmental control over society.”

“Those in academic and other circles in America who wish to impose ‘trigger word’ prohibitions and restrictions on public discourse, in the classroom and in the wider social marketplace of ideas, wish to isolate and insulate their ideas and ideological agendas from the public arena of debate and discourse . .. It is an attempted monopolization of the mind and its ethically and socially permitted conceptual content. And it should not be tolerated or placated, as too many academic administrative authorities seem to be increasingly doing.”

He ends with some dark humor of his own by informing snowflakes and their acolytes that only when his personal trigger words are either banned or at least restricted in their use and appearance, only then will his emotional balance, self-esteem, and sense of not being oppressed, discriminated or abused be assured.

Ebeling’s own trigger words include “collectivism,” “socialism,” “interventionism,” “welfare statism,” “social justice,” “wealth redistribution,” “altruism,” “self-sacrifice” for the group, tribe, society or nation, “public interest,” “common good,” and “general welfare.

Milo Yiannopoulous’ scheduled speech at the UC-Berkeley campus was canceled as student protests turned violent earlier this month

More than 1,500 people gathered in front of the university’s Sproul Hall to protest Milo. The protesters held signs that read “Hate Speech is Not Free Speech.”

To which, critics can only observe, “I disapprove of what you say but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”

At the same time, many Americans – those who still defend the First Amendment – must thank a certain sequin-clad self-proclaimed “faggot” for leading the way back to open discourse, honest communication, and real debate that has a chance of leading somewhere other than the trash heap of safe spaces, trigger words, and microaggressions.

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