Revising history and the Constitution’s Freedom of Religion cornerstone

Revising history and the Constitution’s Freedom of Religion cornerstone

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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo., July 18, 2014 — In an email to constituents today, Colorado Sen. Mark Udall laments the Supreme Court decision in the Hobby Lobby case and vows to overturn it via a bill he has introduced in the Senate.

He may have missed being seen in public with the president last week, but his is fully on board with his socialist agenda.

He writes:

The Hobby Lobby decision was wrong and misguided. That’s why I’ve written legislation to keep corporations out of our private health care decisions, and I’m proud that the U.S. Senate will vote on my bill as early as tomorrow.

Udall believes that the Supreme Court decision, which rested on the First Amendment’s freedom of religion, is really about the ability of “bosses to impose their own personal religious beliefs on employees.”

Udall believes, and would have you believe, that the Supreme Court decision means that people must “ask their boss for a permission slip to access critical health services — birth control or otherwise.”

He says that the decision “turned back the clock on decades of progress toward gender equality by deciding to allow the vast majority of employers to refuse to cover contraception as part of employees’ health insurance policies.”

Could that really be true?

Of course not—and Sen. Udall knows it.

It’s a bold-faced lie that purposefully confuses different concepts. Unlike all of his Democrat colleagues running for reelection this year, Udall is doubling down on his party’s socialist agenda.

Employers began offering health care subsidies to employees during the 1940s, when wartime wage and price controls meant that they could not offer higher wages to attract the best workers. Thinking outside the box, they began offering benefits.

Employer-subsidized health insurance was voluntary—both on the part of the employer and the employee. An employee could accept or refuse it, as could happen if two spouses were both covered by their employer’s plan. They had a choice. People who did not have employer-covered healthcare could buy it on the open market. People could even go without insurance and pay-as-you-go.

That freedom ended when Mark Udall and 59 of his Democrat colleagues in the Senate voted to pass Obamacare. Now employers are forced to provide health insurance or face fines. Now individuals are forced to have health insurance or face fines.

If your boss is in the middle of your health insurance, it’s because Mark Udall put the boss there.

But there’s more that Udall forced on every American. He forced not just any insurance, but government mandated and approved insurance policies on every American. And he forced every employer to pay for whatever policy the government thought was appropriate—not what an employer wanted to offer and not necessarily what the employee felt he or she needed.

Your boss isn’t putting limits on what kind of health insurance you can have, Mark Udall is.

Don’t like being forced into a plan that’s not what you want or can afford? Blame Mark Udall. To be fair, you can also blame the Supreme Court and especially Chief Justice John Roberts who upheld the individual mandate.

The Hobby Lobby case is about the employer mandate. Hobby Lobby and other employers objected to that mandate based on their religious conviction against providing certain abortion-inducing drugs. Note: not all drugs and only four of over twenty contraceptive drugs. When Udall writes “…birth control or otherwise,” he’s lying.

So far, this discussion has only covered health insurance, not health care. Udall wants you to believe that if your employer doesn’t give you any kind of birth control drug you want, you can’t get it. As Democrats have done since 2009, he purposefully confusing insurance with care. That’s absurd.

You can go to Walmart and buy birth control for $4-$12 per month. You can go to Planned Parenthood and get it for free. Abortions are legal before and after the Hobby Lobby decision. Your employer has no say in how you use the health insurance policy she’s paid for.


The only thing that has changed is that employers who have religious objections don’t have to pay for it. Nuns don’t have to be provided birth control.

HLquote-640Neither the Catholic Church nor Hobby Lobby will be forced to fund things that are morally objectionable.

That’s not allowing “bosses to impose their own personal religious beliefs on employees;” that’s preventing Sen. Udall from forcing conformity on bosses regardless of their religious beliefs.

That rather narrow exception to the employer mandate incenses Sen. Udall so much that he’s sponsored the “Not My Boss’s Business Act.” Udall says that he has gotten a priority placed on his bill. Sen. Reid, who lets almost nothing go to a floor vote these days, apparently will allow a vote for Udall’s bill.

“Restore our right to private health care decisions,” says Udall. If that’s really what you want, senator, then repeal Obamacare. Step out from between doctor and patient.

Ironically, Udall closes his email with the words, “I’ve long fought for Coloradans’ freedom to live our lives on our own terms.”

Really, senator? Nothing could be further from the truth.


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