‘Islamophobia’ or ‘Islamoreality’ that is the question

‘Islamophobia’ or ‘Islamoreality’ that is the question

by -
0 631

Islamphobia is a buzz word meaning a fear of Islam. But is that what we are afraid of? Or is it Islamoreality?

Uncredited social media image

CHARLOTTE, NC, October 12, 2016 – The term “Islamophobia” has become an all-to-familiar buzzword -one that never even existed a few years ago. But does it exist? The real question is whether it is truly a phobia” to describe invalid fears of Muslims and Islam.

“Islamophobia” found its way into the presidential town hall debate on Sunday when a Muslim woman asked Donald Trump about his past comments to send refugees home and to provide a clearer vetting process.

Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama, meanwhile, continue to insist that “Islamophobia” is a politicized concoction of anti-Islamic fearmongerers who have distorted the good name of Islam, “the religion of peace.”

Are we becoming numb to the violence of Islam’s radicals

Despite recent attacks in California, Florida, Paris on multiple occasions and other parts the world, the current administration continues to reject the use of the words “Islamic jihad” or “Islamic terrorism.” In so doing, does that mean that terrorism does not exist?

If nothing else, the three election year debates have widened the gap between the American people on the subject by openly demonstrating what everyone already knew anyway, that there is a double standard when it comes to the “elites” of society and every-day average people just trying to make ends meet within the guidelines the “elites” establish for them.

Islamophobia is part of the politically correct game being played in Washington, and whether Donald Trump survives the onslaught of hypocrisy from the left or not, at the very least, he has clearly brought the conversation out into the open.

We are only one-third of the way through October and already Europe has witnessed several more examples of radicalism. At some point, the term “Islamophobia” must give way to “Islamoreality.”

According to the “Clarion Project” attendance at the Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany, the popular annual beer festival which traditionally brings people from all over the world together, fell to its lowest attendance level in 15 years in 2016.

While 5.6 million attendees were on hand to listen to the oompah bands and swill gigantic mugs of beer, visitors dropped by nearly 300,000 participants.

The primary reason given for the lower attendance goes back to New Year’s Eve when German women were molested and groped in large numbers at the Cologne railway station. The attacks received little coverage in the U.S. until well after they took place. Is that “Islamophobia” or “Islamoreality”?

In another German related incident, a 22-year old Syrian man was arrested in Leipzig on Sunday and charged with suspicion of terrorism after police discovered massive amounts of explosives in an apartment in Chemnitz.

Situated in the state of Saxony, Chemnitz is less than 50 miles from Leipzig. Jaber Albakr, a refugee who was granted status last year to remain in Germany, had enough explosives to indicate he was planning a major attack.  Is that “Islamophobia” or “Islamoreality”?

A one-time model from the United Kingdom, formerly known as Kimberly Miners, was arrested last Friday by British law enforcement officials for communicating with ISIS terrorists and for being groomed to become a jihadi bride. Under her new Islamic name of Aisha Lauren al-Britanyia, the 27-year old woman denied the charges against her, telling police that her Facebook profiles were fakes in an effort to set her up.

Is that “Islamophobia” or “Islamoreality”?

Obama’s ‘Islamic terrorism’ rhetoric: Pure sophistry

Finally, and perhaps most frightening, is the news out of France, which has been the victim of multiple terrorist attacks in 2016, that nearly 2,000 children are on a government watchlist on suspicion of radicalization.

The story broke Sunday, saying the youngest was only 11-years old.

French Prime Minister Manuel Valls announced in September that 15,000 people were being monitored by police intelligence as suspects for radicalization.

Is that “Islamophobia” or “Islamoreality”?

In its typical misdirection, which was also used by the Muslim woman who posed the question to Trump, the inference was that Muslims are being targeted or profiled on a much larger scale than others.

In so doing, there is always the rarely reported aspect of the story that the preponderance of terrorist attacks worldwide are carried out by Muslims.

Equally overlooked is the fact that while most Muslims may not be radical or radicalized, the religion itself is, indeed, radical and has never undergone any form of enlightenment since its inception in the year 622.

Apologists may continue pour out their advocacy of Islam along with its cries of “victimization”, but the truth is that while a small amount of those fears could be the result of “Islamophobia”, there is a far greater chance that “Islamoreality” is the true culprit.

Contact Bob at Google+

Bob Taylor has been traveling the world for more than 30 years as a writer and award winning television producer focusing on international events, people and cultures around the globe.

Taylor is founder of The Magellan Travel Club (www.MagellanTravelClub.com)

Read more of What in the World and Bob Taylor at Communities Digital News

Follow Bob on Twitter @MrPeabod

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 Communities Digital News

This article is the copyrighted property of the writer and Communities Digital News, LLC. Written permission must be obtained before reprint in online or print media. REPRINTING CONTENT WITHOUT PERMISSION AND/OR PAYMENT IS THEFT AND PUNISHABLE BY LAW.

Correspondingly, Communities Digital News, LLC uses its best efforts to operate in accordance with the Fair Use Doctrine under US Copyright Law and always tries to provide proper attribution. If you have reason to believe that any written material or image has been innocently infringed, please bring it to the immediate attention of CDN via the e-mail address or phone number listed on the Contact page so that it can be resolved expeditiously.