Iran can smell America’s fear

Iran can smell America’s fear

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Iran’s ruling mullahs live charmed lives.

Jimmy Carter awaits his cue to address the nation on the Iranian hostage crisis. (Inset) A Time magazine cover pertaining to the crisis.

WASHINGTON, Oct. 6, 2015 — Iran’s ruling mullahs live charmed lives. According to a Washington Times story, President Bill Clinton withheld evidence from the American people concerning Iran’s involvement in the 1996 bombing of the Khobar Towers in Saudi Arabia that killed 19 and wounded hundreds of U.S. military personnel.

Testimony collected by FBI investigators included “interviews with a half-dozen Saudi co-conspirators who revealed they got their passports from the Iranian embassy in Damascus, reported to a top Iranian general and were trained by Iran’s Revolutionary Guard (IRGC).”

Former Clinton FBI Director Louis Freeh told the Times he had to go around White House obstructionists to get those interviews with Iranian-trained terrorists held in Saudi custody.

When Freeh eventually presented the evidence to the president, “it was dismissed as ‘hearsay,’ and he [Freeh] was asked not to spread it around because the administration had made a policy decision to warm relations with Tehran and didn’t want to rock the boat,” Freeh told the Times.

In 2007, the Bush administration “released nine Iranians no longer deemed a threat, including two accused of membership in the elite force suspected of arming [Iraqi] Shiite militias.

“The handover, planned for several days, leaves at least three high-profile Iranians in U.S. custody. It doesn’t ease the many disputes between Washington and Tehran in Iraq. But it could open the door for another round of talks between the two nations, which have been without diplomatic relations for 28 years,” said the Associated Press.

Although Bush lumped Iran together with North Korea, calling them the “Axis of Evil,” he never made Iran pay for killing Americans in Iraq.

According to a Pentagon report released in September, nearly 200 Americans were killed by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) supplied to Iraq’s Shiite militias by Iran’s elite Quds Force.

President Obama secured 42 votes in the United States Senate to sustain his deal with Iran that guarantees that the terrorist state will develop a nuclear weapon to threaten the nations denounced in their daily Orwellian, two-minutes’ hate, “Death to America … death to Israel.”

During the 1979 Iranian hostage crisis, President Jimmy Carter said despite American “anger and outrage” over the taking of  U.S. diplomatic personnel in Tehran, he believed “measured, deliberate action” was the best course.

Four-hundred forty-four days of inaction later, the hostages were released while President Ronald Reagan took the oath of office.

The Reagan administration would later find itself embroiled in scandal when it was discovered that White House functionaries negotiated a secret arms sale to Iran for the release of American hostages held by Iranian ally Hezbollah in Lebanon.

The consistent pattern seems to be that, as more Americans die at the hands of Iran and her partners, the more desperate American administrations, Democratic and Republican, are to achieve better relations with the modern world’s first Islamic Republic.

Will that policy apply in the event of Iranian nuclear blackmail or worse?

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