Hillary Clinton’s Twitter problem

Hillary Clinton’s Twitter problem

Hillary Clinton has a new Twitter problem. Its a lack of awareness about what she is posting in the campaigns quest to demean Donald Trump.

Uncredited Image of Hillary Clinton - Widely used via social media

WASHINGTON, November 1, 2016 – She has brought this issue unto herself and she has no one to blame but herself, says Republican nominee Donald Trump who continues to hammer Clinton on her ongoing scandals.

The latest revelations seem to be reinforcing concerns voters may have about the candidate in regard to her trust worthiness, likability, not protecting state secrets, unflattering comments about Catholics, blacks, trump supporters, super predators, qualification to be president, corruption via the Clinton Foundation, cheating in debates with Dona Brazile’s help, DNC collusion against Bernie Sanders, and so forth and so on.

And she seems willing to help him. In their quest to share a very negative, anti Trump article on Slate.com, the campaign inadvertently tweeted out that she is one of the “most corrupt, least popular candidates of all time:

Hillary Clinton from Twitter.com
Hillary Clinton from Twitter.com

 

Which some may say is a bit of refreshing, if not more faux pas than intentional action, honesty on the part of the Democrat’s nominee. The link, which goes to a Slate article pounding Trump, has nothing to do with the responses, because Tweeters don’t read articles, they respond to Tweets.  And the Twitterverse response was pretty fast and furious, and its ongoing – at least until someone at the Hillary campaign realizes the less than complimentary thread they have brewing on their page.

The following are just a few of the screen shots responses to the original tweet, versus embeds (original here), so they cannot be deleted by the campaign):

 

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And the response to the latest headlines does not stop in the social media realm. It’s gotten so bad that super Democratic pollster and longtime Clinton ally Doug Schoen, former advisor to Bill Clinton, has publicly declared he will not be voting for Mrs. Clinton telling Fox News’ Harris Faulkner he is concerned we would have a Constitutional Crisis if Clinton made it to the White House:

Schoen told Fox News host Harris Faulkner that he decided to reconsider his support of Clinton due to the ongoing FBI investigation into her private email use while serving as secretary of state.

“As you know, I have been a supporter of Secretary Clinton,” he said. “But if the secretary of state wins, we will have a president under criminal investigation, with Huma Abedin under criminal investigation, with the secretary of state, the president-elect, should she win, under investigation.”

Schoen’s departures are not the only campaign separation news.  Clinton has demoted aide Huma Abedin from being as my ‘daughter’ and ‘trusted aide’ to “staffer“.

As a result of the most recent headlines, the polls are changing in Donald Trump’s favor.  ABC.Com reports:

(November 1, 2016) Strong enthusiasm for Hillary Clinton has ebbed since the renewal of the FBI’s email investigation.

While vote preferences have held essentially steady, she’s now a slim point behind Donald Trump — a first since May — in the latest ABC News/Washington Post tracking poll, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates.

Forty-six percent of likely voters support Trump in the latest results, with 45 percent for Clinton. Taking it to the decimal for illustrative purposes, a mere .7 of a percentage point divides them. Third-party candidate Gary Johnson has 3 percent, a new low; Jill Stein, 2 percent.

Republican Trump was in the lead with enthusiastic voters by 8 points as of last Friday, ABC.com reports, But, compared to past elections it’s low for both of them –- 53 percent for Trump, 45 percent for Clinton.

Strong enthusiasm for Clinton has lost 7 points since the start of tracking, especially Friday through Sunday. This is possibly an after-effect of the renewed controversy over her use of a private email server while secretary of state. Trump’s strong enthusiasm has held steady in tracking, which started Oct. 20.

In response to Trump’s tightening of the polls, the Clinton campaign is announcing that they will restart advertising in Colorado and Wisconsin in hopes of reenergizing Clinton voters.

But at the end of the voting day (November 8) this election will come down to America’s morals and the question of whether we are still a moral nation, if we ever were.

In a June 2015 Gallup report,  Five Things We’ve Learned About Americans and Moral Values, we learn that America’s morals are not defined with blinders and its less about gay marriage and more about how we treat each other.

Which may go against Clinton’s negative campaign ads she is planning on launching in this last week. If you are saying “What about Trump’s negativity” remember he is fully invested in the anger American’s have for inside the Beltway corruption:

From Gaullup:

72% of Americans say the state of moral values is getting worse in this country rather than better. And almost as many rate the state of moral values in this country as poor or only fair.

As my colleague Justin McCarthy pointed out in his review, these attitudes have remained very stable, despite the leftward shift in Americans’ (and Republicans’) positions on specific moral issues and how they label themselves. Gallup has been noting in a series of articles that Americans are shifting left on moral issues. But they aren’t shifting on their views of the state of moral values in the country. Why the change in one area and not the other?

In part, this can be explained by understanding that when Americans are asked about moral values (“How would you rate the overall state of moral values in this country today — as excellent, good, only fair or poor?” and “Right now, do you think the state of moral values in the country as a whole is getting better or getting worse?”) they are thinking about things other than just the norms surrounding sexual behavior and reproduction issues. When we asked Americans a few years ago to talk about what was wrong with moral values, many responded by talking about the lack of consideration of others, deficits in the public’s compassion, personal accountability, respect and tolerance; greed, selfishness, dishonesty — in addition to things such as the change in family structure, lack of religion, lack of morals (a somewhat tautological response) and fairly small percentages who mention sexual promiscuity, abortion and gay marriage, specifically. Thus, we have Americans largely saying that the overall moral tone of our culture is in bad shape and getting worse, even as they increasingly say that formerly taboo behaviors are morally acceptable.

During the Obama administration, there was a movement to step away from being a “moral America” thinking that America and conservatives morals where only based on sexual behavior.  Which is anecdotally far from the truth. Its more about being morally honest, and good to other people.

Which is why Trump may win the day.  One week to find out.

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Jacquie Kubin
Jacquie Kubin is an award winning writer and wanderer. She turns her thoughts to an eclectic mix of stories - from politics to sports. Restless by nature and anxious to experience new things, both in the real world and online, Jacquie mostly shares travel and culinary highlights, introduces readers to the chefs and creative people she meets and shares the tips, life and travel information people want to read.