Tsimhoni children cultists, or abused?

Tsimhoni children cultists, or abused?

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More problems in the Tsimhoni custody case

WASHINGTON, Oct. 15, 2015 — The individual chosen to implement a five-day reunification therapy in an explosive Michigan custody case had little more than a high school education, was working with a suspended psychiatrist and revealed an inherent bias toward the father.

A Michigan judge ordered three Tsimhoni children to engage in controversial “reunification therapy” after they refused to spend time with their father, Omer Tsimhoni. Judge Lisa Gorcyca of the Oakland County Family Court had previously sentenced the children to juvenile hall after refusing to have lunch with their father, who they say has been repeatedly abusive toward the children.

CDN has now learned that the three Tsimhoni children completed the five-day reunification therapy with Dorcy Pruter, who runs the Conscious Co-Parenting Institute. Pruter stated in a Wyoming deposition for another case that she ran the Tsimhoni children’s reunification therapy, despite statements on her web site that “this is not therapy.”

In her Wyoming deposition, Pruter goes on to say, “As a matter of fact, that particular judge said the alienating parent was like Charles Manson and they were her cult.”

Pruter is referring to a controversial statement Judge Lisa Gorcyca made addressing the mother of the children, Maya Eibschitz-Tsimhoni: “Your children — you need to do a research program on Charlie Manson and the cult that he has. Your behavior in the hall with me months ago, your behavior in this courtroom, your behavior back there is unlike any I’ve seen in 46,000 cases. You, young man, are the worst one. So you have bought yourself living in Children’s Village, going to the bathroom in public and maybe summer school, I don’t know.”

In the same deposition, Pruter parroted those thoughts when describing the three Tsimhoni children: “These children really had a lot of cult-like behavior. They were — they were doing tapping, the way they were speaking to each other.”

Pruter didn’t respond to numerous emails for comment for this story. Emails to Bill Lansat, the guardian ad litum in the case and Keri Middleditch, the father’s attorney were also left unanswered.

During the same deposition, Pruter acknowledged that her formal education ended with high school. “Well, I have a high school education and then all of my certifications and classes afterwards.”

During the same deposition, Pruter said she was helped in her reunification therapy by Dr. Randy Rand. The Board of Psychology in California recently suspended Rand’s license for “unprofessional conduct in two different court proceedings.”

During her testimony in the Wyoming case, Pruter also revealed an inherent bias. She said, “Because my parents were divorced, I — and it was a very high-conflict divorce, and I was alienated from my dad and I was raised by a single mom.”

The Tsimhoni case involves an acrimonious custody battle over the children. The children and the mother say they were repeatedly victims of domestic violence at the hands of the father, Omer Tsimhoni. The father claims the mother intentionally alienated the children from him.

CDN first published evidence supporting the version of events from the mother and the children. CDN obtained a police report, medical report, Child Protective Services (CPS) report and an email from at least one outside psychologist showing domestic abuse. However, all that evidence has been rejected by the court, which instead believes the allegations of parental alienation.

If Pruter felt her father was a victim of parental alienation, this would give her an inherent conflict of interest and make her biased toward the father in the Tsimhoni case.

Parental alienation is a controversial term which has not gained widespread acceptance in psychology. It has no one meaning, but is a group of behaviors that lead to children unnaturally rejecting the love of one parent in favor of the other.

For at least a century, suspected abusers have claimed they are alienated parents.

“My fine boy has been alienated from me for a few years already by my wife, who has a vengeful disposition,” Albert Einstein wrote to his friend and fellow scientist Fritz Haber in 1915.

In fact, Einstein’s first marriage to Mileva Maric broke up because of an affair he had with his cousin. Furthermore, Einstein claimed to be alienated only after Maric demanded he not see his children with his cousin/lover.

In research for his recently published biography entitled “Annus Mirabilis,” Hans Grossman discovered that Einstein was twice arrested for domestic violence.

In Connecticut, Angelo Gizzi was convicted of multiple counts of domestic violence against his then wife Angela Hickman with the marriage disintegrating after he threw the pregnant Hickman down the stairs, but the court recently gave Gizzi sole custody after it determined Hickman was a parent alienator.

Gizzi received sole custody after Hickman refused to attend a similar reunification therapy because being in the same room with her abuser would have flared up her post-traumatic stress disorder.

“She (Hickman) has not succeeded in dealing with the anxiety of being in Mr. Gizzi’s presence. She has refused to be in the same room with him or to engage in any co-parenting counseling,” Judge Maureen Murphy said of Hickman.

When Murphy was a lawyer, she was the guardian ad litem in one of the most explosive cases in Connecticut custody history.

Murphy was one of more than 10 professionals, all belonging to the Connecticut branch of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts, who dismissed allegations of child molestation and pegged the mother as the parental alienator.

In Minnesota, one of the most explosive cases, the Grazzini-Rucki case, allegations of abuse have also been eschewed in favor of purported parental alienation by the mother.

The girls ran away from a foster home they were forced to live in two years ago.

“About three weeks after the girls disappeared, they appeared on a local TV news show and said they ran away because they were afraid of their father. That was the last time they were seen in public,” according to a Minnesota news story on the case.

In the Wyoming deposition, Pruter called her reunification therapy a full success.

“I’m happy to report everybody is doing well and it has been a couple weeks. That’s the most recent reunification I just did. And they were very challenging kids.”

But Lansat was far more lukewarm in his assessment. “The kids began sleeping at their father’s home, attending school all while living with their father,” he said in a September court filing. “However, a few weeks ago the children may have received outside information about this case that has reverted the kids to some of the behavior before the therapy.”

The children have no choice but to be reunified with their father as they are court-ordered to live with him and not communicate at all with their mother, making any so-called success entirely subjective.

Pruter also falsely claimed that, prior to being reunified with his children, the father had not seen them in six years. In fact, he saw them sporadically, largely because he mostly lives in Israel, and in fact a March 2015 visit was the subject of one allegation of abuse in which Omer Tsimhoni allegedly threatened to kill his children.

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