Keeping New Year’s resolutions

Yes, you really can keep those New Year's resolutions.

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ST. LOUIS, 1 January 2017 – New Year’s Day is a day to reflect on the past year and give yourself a report card and then plan for the coming year in the form of your resolutions.  “Sometimes you have to look at the past to see the future”.

 This really is not a trivial matter if you are serious about your resolutions for the coming year relative to such topics as:  health, financials, relationship, career path, job performance and other things that are important to you as an individual.

But remember you must have the motivation to accomplish these resolutions.

The following are some on how to accomplish your resolutions.


First you should decide on what are the most important resolutions you want to accomplish. This again could be about your health such as losing weight or if you have diabetes on how you are going to maintain your sugar levels.

Next just select maybe two resolutions that are the most important rather than selecting say twenty-five. Make them achievable. You can always add to the list of resolutions. Now when it comes to your mental approach to achieving your objectives maybe the following approach—For example “I am going to lose fifty pounds” which in its self is a stressful statement versus saying to yourself “This year I am going to explore on how I can lose fifty pounds”.

Now keep in mind that what you do on the first day of the year will have an effect throughout the entire year.

Now we must make a plan and once the plan has been developed put it into a place that you will see every day. Try to break the plan down-nobody accomplishes anything by trying to do it all at once. If you are trying to lose weight for example maybe you break the plan down as follows: The number of pounds I want to lose, how will I accomplish this – a weight plan, exercise, type and amount of exercise, diet, checking with the doctor and the list goes on until you have identified all of the milestones to accomplish your objective of the number of pounds you want to lose.  “Never try to eat the whole cake as one piece rather break it down into smaller pieces otherwise you will choke on it”.

The identification of the most important resolutions that are achievable and the development of the plan are the hardest to accomplish but when this has been accomplished the easiest –with desire and determination – is execution and adherence to the plan.

Remember this resolution plan may have to be modified as you proceed due to un-foreseen happenings. Modify and keep working to achieve your objectives. The year will past and you will have another report card to evaluate on how you did. Good luck.

Let’s get ready to have a wonderful year and to keep those resolutions!

 

 

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Charles Vandegriff, Sr.
Charles is a fifty-four-year career in technology retiring at the directors level from three major corporations. Followed by three-plus years as a free-lance columnist, published three books, over three hundred speeches to senior organizations, radio interviews, one television commercial and finally married for sixty-five years, four children, seven grandchildren and thirteen great grand children. Charles is also a Navy veteran.