Easter holiday food: Heavenly deviled eggs (Recipe)

Easter holiday food: Heavenly deviled eggs (Recipe)

Hide flaws and boost flavor with creative garnishes for your deviled eggs

Deviled eggs by Hail Mary Food of Grace

LOS ANGELES,  April 2, 2015 – Do you have to bring deviled eggs to this year’s Easter Eggstravaganza party? Prepare for failed success; with one easy tip you don’t have to worry about your egg whites looking perfect when you plan for at least a few of them to be a mess.

Deviled eggs can be an easy dish to bring to any event, but before you get to the easy part (whipping the yolks), you have to tackle peeling the eggs.

First and foremost, try to buy the freshest, largest eggs possible. This is one time that spending a little extra for farm-fresh and organic eggs, which tend to be fresher than industrial farm eggs, is well worth the investment.

You can check the freshness of eggs by submerging them in water. If they are fresh, they will sink as the white and yolk completely fill the egg.

If they are older, some of the “liquid” will have evaporated through the porous egg, creating an air pocket that will rise to the end of the egg, which will float.

When you first crack the egg, you might notice the easier to peel eggs don’t have a membrane covering the white; this is where cold running water and the freshest possible egg help.

At the end of the day, some eggs are just not going to peel, so always boil more eggs than you need for your tray.

There are so many tricks to peeling eggs. For example:

  • Cooling the eggs completely before attempting to peel them, even submerging them in iced water.
  • Adding a splash of white vinegar to the water. The acid helps to break down the protein in the shell, making it easier to peel without affecting the flavor of the egg. Rinse well before peeling and do not use any cracked eggs as the vinegar may have seeped into the egg. Save those for salads!
  • Using the curvature of a spoon to peel the eggs with ease,
  • Gently rolling the egg on a clean towel to break up the egg shell completely before peeling it away.
  • Running cold water over the egg to help separate the shell from the white while you are peeling it.

Despite all of these wonderful tricks you still may have a few egg whites that look terrible, despite your attempts to prevent damaged eggs.

What do you do? Plan for the ugliness by buying beautiful garnishes to cover unsightly spots and add flavor to your eggs..

What type of garnishes?

  • Basil leaves
  • Chopped spears of chive atop a bit of mustard
  • Cilantro leaves with a dollop of salsa
  • Edible flowers
  • Shaved cheeses with a bit of spicy relish
  • Small twists of prosciutto ham with a dollop of stone ground mustard

Almost any flavor combination can be used to enhance your deviled eggs.  Just remember, the garnish should not overtake the egg and be small enough to eat in one or two bites, meaning that it will easily bite in-half.

HMFG-deviled-egg-2In the pictures you will see that we have used baby basil leaves to hide our errors. We gently placed the basil leaf partially in the whipped yolk and partially billowing down over the unsightly side of the egg white.

We also used chili powder to garnish and flavor the deviled eggs and give it a bit of the “devil.”  Smoked paprika can be used for a different flavor.

We lightly sprinkled the chili powder over the top of the entire egg to take focus away from any broken areas of the egg whites.

Remember a good cook doesn’t give up. There’s always a way to fix something and still make it both delicious and a work of culinary art.

Try our delicious twist on an old classic deviled egg recipe and then garnish to make it our own!

Deviled eggs

Serves 12 (12 egg halves)


6 eggs

3 tablespoons good mayonnaise

2 ½ teaspoons champagne vinegar

½ teaspoon country Dijon mustard

Salt and pepper to taste

Our Garnish:

12 baby basil leaves

½ teaspoon chili powder or paprika


Add 6 eggs to cold water in a large pot. The water should cover the eggs completely.

Bring the eggs to a simmer, which should take about 5 minutes.

Simmer the eggs for 10 minutes.

Then remove the eggs from the water and allow them to cool.

Peel the eggs using your favorite technique or try mine, which is peeling under cold running water.

When all of the eggs are peeled, cut them in half in a clean, very sharp knife (be careful).

Add all of the yolks into a mixing bowl and add the champagne vinegar, mayonnaise, Dijon mustard, salt and pepper to the egg yolks.

Whip the egg yolks with a whisk and season them with salt and pepper.

Add the egg yolk mixture to a piping bag or a Ziploc bag.

Cut the end of the bag and pipe the yolk into the egg white hole.

Garnish the egg with the basil leaf and make sure to cover any unsightly areas of the white with the leaf.

Lightly sprinkle the chili powder over the eggs.


BONUS TIP: Here is one more trick to keeping clean up easy: Place a paper towel in the sink and peel the shells onto the paper towel.















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Mary Moran
Upon graduating from the California School of Culinary Arts in 2002, Chef Mary Payne Moran began her professional career shelling crabs at the world-renowned restaurant, Michael's in Santa Monica. Simultaneously, she launched her own company, Hail Mary’s, founded upon the belief that good food nurtures the soul, and began catering weddings, parties and large corporate events. In the fall of 2008, Mary began teaching her culinary skills to others. Currently she can be found at Hollywood School House teaching her after school cooking class, and teaching her popular "Vegetables or Not Here I Come" assembly. Most recently, Mary has launched another division in her company as well as a chef she is now also a Certified Nutritionist for high profile clients. She helps her clients discover their healthy way of eating. Mary has recently been published in the Los Angeles Magazine, & The New Jersey Star Ledger. Daily she addresses cooking aficionados through her blog - Cooking with Chef Mary as well as her how-to webisodes on You Tube.