Do wines that cost more, taste better?

Do wines that cost more, taste better?

Answering the ages old question of whether more money means better wine.

SEATTLE, June 1, 2015 The age-old issue of wine prices continues to play a big part in an industry that’s been plagued with many “snobs” over the years. This “snobbery” is very evident in the New World, where we see wealthy people buy certain brands of wine based largely on wine scores.

Those wines that score above 95 points from either Robert Parker or Wine Spectator tend to create a massive consumer and trade demand that allows wineries that receive those scores to jack up the price.

But in the end, do wines really taste that much better than their lower-end counterparts?

Vox takes a good look at this issue and comes away with some rather surprising results. One caveat we’d like to point out, however, is Vox’s use of a pathetic wine glass that’s clearly not intended to properly showcase a wine in its best light.

The other thing to bear in mind here is that many wines priced well above the $50 mark are intended to lay down for a few years or even up to thirty. So to pit an expensive wine that’s meant to lay down for years against a young, fruit-forward wine, isn’t exactly an apples to apples comparison.

Also worth noting is that simply comparing wines because their the same varietal, doesn’t tell the whole story of the wine or vineyard sources, either.

What this video does do an brilliant job of, however, is showing that prices don’t matter as long as you enjoy the wine. It also asks the important question that if a wine sells for $100, is it 10 times better than one priced at $10?

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