On Oscars night, vote with your T.V. remote

The Oscars are coming—a night of pageantry, glamor, and attacks on President Trump and his red-state deplorables. Will it get better ratings than Trump's inauguration? You decide.

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WASHINGTON, January 25, 2017 — On Tuesday, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced the nominees for its 89th annual awards ceremony, for which late-night host and comedian Jimmy Kimmel will serve as master of ceremonies.

During the presidential campaign, Hillary Clinton appeared on Kimmel’s talk show. The former secretary of state—whose protectors helped her ascend stairs, suffered a public fainting spell, and was prone to speech-interrupting coughing spells—managed to unscrew a lid to a pickle jar as a demonstration of vibrant, good health and presidential strength.

Hillary Clinton shows her strength on ABC’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live.”

With the Golden Globes broadcast earlier this month serving as a predictor of likely Academy Award winners, the only guessing left for America’s commoners is the tone and quality of insults to be hurled at President Trump and, indirectly, at the heartland’s viewers and voters by Hollywood royals.


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Hollywood will never forgive Trump’s America for sending the Clinton duo to ignominious oblivion.

Another question is whether the Oscar ceremony will continue losing viewers. Last year’s Hollywood lovefest, hosted by comedian Chris Rock, saw a 6 percent drop in viewership from the previous year. According to the Nielsen organization, the telecast suffered its third worst ratings since the event was first televised in 1953.

Speaking of ratings, the very first tussle between the Trump White House and the infotainment media was over the very question of ratings. Trump’s inaugural ratings to be precise.

Donald Trump takes the oath of office.

White House spokesman Sean Spicer boasted that Trump’s inaugural had “the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration—period—both in person and around the globe.”

The media was quick to point out that former President Barack Obama’s 2009 inauguration garnered 37.8 million viewers to Trump’s 30.6 million; Trump had 19 percent fewer oglers.

Which means, as dismal as the ratings for 2016’s Academy Awards were, they still gathered 4.2 million more viewers than Trump got on inauguration day.

Such is the power of narrative.


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Shaping the national narrative is a theme carried over from the presidential campaign. White House spokesman Sean Spicer told the Washington press corps they were “engaged in deliberately false reporting” and perpetuating “false narratives.”

The torrent of false reporting concerning the inevitability of Hillary Clinton’s White House win, coupled with manufactured polls, bolsters Spicer’s case.

Spicer added the new administration would “hold the press accountable” but made no mention of holding the entertainment industry accountable for its false narratives.

A boycott of the Academy Awards broadcast and cable news networks like CNN and MSNBC is a good start.

And a few tweets in that regard from President Trump would go a long way in diminishing the power of infotainment’s skewed narrative.

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