‘Annie Hall’ named funniest movie screenplay of all time

‘Annie Hall’ named funniest movie screenplay of all time



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The Writers Guild of American put Woody Allen’s autobiographical film at the top of its “101 Funniest Screenplays” list. Did your favorite make the list?

"Annie Hall" written by Woody Allen was named the funniest film screenplay by the Writers Guild of America.

SAN DIEGO, November 12, 2015 – Who made you laugh the most? Dustin Hoffman’s cross dressing out of work actor in “Tootsie”? Bill Murray’s jaded weatherman in “Groundhog Day”? Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon chasing Marilyn Monroe in “Some Like It Hot”? Gene Wilder in any of his many roles for Mel Brooks? The Monty Python crew spoofing the Middle Ages? Leslie Nielsen? Surely you can’t be serious … and don’t call me Shirley.

The Writers Guild of America announced its “101 Funniest Screenplays” as part of a panel discussion Wednesday night in Hollywood featuring film clips from many of the selections, hosted by actor Rob Reiner. The film at the top of the list: Woody Allen’s 1977 autobiographical film “Annie Hall.” In second place was the slapstick gangster send up directed by Billy Wilder in 1959, “Some Like It Hot.” Bill Murray’s “Groundhog Day” (1993) was third. The satire “Airplane!” (1980) came in fourth, and “Tootsie” (1982) rounded out the top five.

"Airplane!" (1980) starring Leslie Nielsen and Robert Hays made the top five.
“Airplane!” (1980) starring Leslie Nielsen and Robert Hays made the top five.

Read the entire list of films here.

Woody Allen also has the most credits on the list, with seven films on the list: “Bananas,” “Broadway Danny Rose,” “Love and Death,” “Manhattan,” “Sleeper,” and “Take the Money and Run.”

The oldest film on the list is “The Gold Rush,” produced in 1925 and starring Charlie Chaplin. It is one of three Chaplin films on the list, sitting at Number 94. The most recent film is four years old, Number 16: “Bridesmaids,” starring Kristen Wiig. “Bridesmaids” is also the only film on the list written by two women, Wiig and Annie Mumolo.

None of the top 15 films on the list debuted in the 21st Century. They appeared between 1959 and 1998. Only 14 films out of 101 on the list debuted since 2000.

"Blazing Saddles" (1974) starring Cleavon Little, and Gene Wilder was number eight on the list. Photo: Warner Bros./Courtesy Neal Peters Collection
“Blazing Saddles” (1974) starring Cleavon Little, and Gene Wilder was number eight on the list. Photo: Warner Bros./Courtesy Neal Peters Collection

My personal favorite, “Blazing Saddles,” came in at Number 8. It features the highest-placed African-American screenwriter with a credit on the list, the late comedian Richard Pryor.

Did your favorite film make the list? Which ones are you happy to see honored, and which are overrated or just plain unfunny in your opinion? Tell us in the comment section.

Gayle Lynn Falkenthal, APR, is President/Owner of the Falcon Valley Group in San Diego, California. Read more Media Migraine in the Communities Digital News. Follow Gayle on Facebook and on Twitter @PRProSanDiego.

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