Coastal Florida, Orlando, batten down the hatches for Matthew

Coastal Florida, Orlando, batten down the hatches for Matthew

Many coastal Floridians seem to be heeding the warnings of Governor Rick Scott to expect the worst, as they button up their vulnerable homes and pack up their cars before getting out of Dodge prior to Matthew's unwanted visit.

NOAA's current predicted storm track for Hurricane Matthew as of late afternoon Thursday, October 6, 2016.

COASTAL FLORIDA, October 6, 2016 — At this point, it’s looking like the entirety of Florida’s Atlantic seaboard  as well as the Sunshine State’s interior is getting ready for either a glancing blow or a direct hit from powerful Hurricane Matthew, fast approaching this evening after already wreaking mass devastation on Haiti.

The hurricane’s path at the moment has it traveling right up America’s Atlantic coast after rolling north and then northeast from the northern Keys through Jacksonville, causing huge problems for residents there. These include massive waves and tidal erosion, torrential rains and high winds as the storm proceeds to and past Savannah Georgia, Charleston South Carolina, perhaps touchig Wilmington North Carolina before taking a sharp turn out to sea. (See the NOAA chart above.)

Beyond that it’s anyone’s guess. Other possible paths have the still-powerful hurricane taking its right turn as it closes in on Virginia Beach. On the other hand, Matthew could also hew to its the coastal track and cause considerable devastation from southern Virginia and the Delmarva Peninsula right up through New Jersey and New York City before finally heading out to see. The next 24 hours will give us a better idea.

Currently trying to decide if it’s going to be a Category 3 or Category 4 storm when it hits southern Florida, Matthew is likely to pack the biggest wallop as it hits southern Florida and rolls up the state through Daytona Beach, St. Augustine, Jacksonville and beyond.

Many coastal Floridians seem to be heeding the warnings of Governor Rick Scott to expect the worst, as they button up their vulnerable homes and pack up their cars before getting out of Dodge prior to Matthew’s unwanted visit. Residents and companies of inland Florida—particularly those vital businesses like banks and grocery chains—are also battening down the hatches as this report from the Orlando Sentinel makes clear.


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